Dangerous Deflections: Stop Diagnosing The President. It Helps America's Enemies

There is a very good reason to not psychiatrically diagnose the commander in chief based on television appearances and tweets. First, and probably most obvious, is it is an incomplete process and very unethical. The second is less obvious if one lacks the basic common sense of a 12-year-old. When major media publications question the president’s mental health based on remote diagnostics from people who’ve never even spoken to him they hand hostile actors talking points to deflect from their hostile actions.

And that’s precisely what is happened today. There have been rumbles and whispers about the president’s mental health dating back to September Washington Post ran this piece titled “Is Trump Mentally Ill? Or Is America?”

“Now, some psychiatrists and other mental-health professionals are shedding long-held norms to argue that Trump’s condition presents risks to the nation and the world.”

Even then the Washington Post was aware of how dangerous this trend could be. And today it proved itself right.

And then like clockwork, the greatest threat to regional stability in the Middle East and maybe the world, Iran, seized on this gift-wrapped talking point from the media defending Barack Obama’s legacy like their careers depend on it (because they likely do):

https://twitter.com/dananawzar/status/950731800221020160

Days before the White House is set to yet again decide on recertifying the Iran Deal, the media chatter isn’t about the abysmal deal but rather the mental state of the person who has to make a decision on the agreement. This is what the Iran Deal echo chamber does best: deflection. They were taught well by their basement Sith Lord, former National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes.

It’s easier to deflect from the nuclear agreement with Iran and four other countries than it is to actually defend it on its merits. Nevertheless, the use of this particular deflection is not only unethical but threatens national security. It’s similar to the deflection used when Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton wrote a letter to Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif telling him this deal was not binding and the next president could walk away from it. At first, the echo chamber accused Cotton, an Iraq veteran, of treason and when that didn’t stick they just made fun of the fact that he was from Arkansas and had no business addressing his global elite betters.

Almost three years later, every single word Sen. Tom Cotton said in his letter is still true and the Iran Deal Shill Squad is still weakly deflecting from the facts with silly and contrived narratives. The worst part is having to pretend these petty dishonest partisans are on equal intellectual ground.