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Policing America: Starting Over Again

AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

Policing in America is under fire. Heavy fire. The very definition of how policing is done in America may change.

Social justice activism is causing law enforcement to abandon crime prevention initiatives. Violent crime is on the rise. Americans across the entire political spectrum are beginning to wonder openly if the only thing in the Constitution they can still rely on is the Second Amendment. Survival is returning to the American psyche. In the police vacuum, criminal activity including shootings have jumped, over 100% increases in many cases. Unsatisfied, social justice activists call for even more cuts. State and local governments oblige the mob’s rule. The country discovers the consequences haphazardly.

I have been actively working with police departments for almost 30 years of involvement helping police departments to develop community policing and other programs that bridge the gap between traditional policing and social services.

The journey began in 1992 just after the L.A. Riots. I have watched decade after decade of mission creep as society asked police departments to take on more and more social services and population segment babysitting.  I’ve seen law enforcement strain beyond the limit again and again trying to live up to impossible demands to be everything to everyone.

Come 2020, in an instant, I’ve see those decades of work, all those investments of energy into solutions, evaporate.

My friend actress Kelly Carlson, of “Nip Tuck” fame, asked me to spend an hour videoing an interview talking about what I’ve seen, how I think about being helpful, how I interpret today’s events, and where I think the challenges lie ahead as the United States rethinks what law and order in our country should become.

P.S. I would not hesitate to do any of it all over again. America is worth it.

Here is the interview.