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If Fauci Thinks Rand Paul and Jim Jordan are "Extreme People" Then We're All Extreme People

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Earlier, I posted an article that showed Dr. Anthony Fauci labeling Republicans, Sen. Rand, Paul, and Rep. Jim Jordan as “extreme people.” While it wouldn’t be the first time Fauci made it clear that he’s partisan, it was a moment that bothered me more than all the others due to his claim that the two politicians in question were far to the right.

(READ: Fauci Shows His True Partisan Colors, Attacks Rand Paul and Jim Jordan with Ridiculous Label)

Fauci said this during an interview where he admitted that he had been politicized by people like Paul and Jordan and that this politicization of his job is only done by people who belong to the far corners of their respective political parties. It could have been a centrist observation if he hadn’t immediately thrown Paul and Jordan up as examples while answering an obviously leading question on a network known for its hard-leftist bent.

The truth is that Paul and Jordan were respectively asking questions that weren’t inherently political. For instance, Jordan’s question was so simple that I’m surprised it hadn’t been asked so bluntly beforehand.

“Dr. Fauci, when is the time?”

Jordan was asking Fauci to give us a steady finish line for when the pandemic would be considered over. Jordan wanted a number that we could try to obtain before we got the all-clear in terms of infection rates or vaccinations. Fauci didn’t give him one and, instead, danced around the answer until Jordan’s time was up.

Watching the video, it’s clear that Jordan was definitely angry and frustrated, but “extreme” isn’t a word I’d use. It’s clear that Americans have had to give up one too many freedoms, many of them have lost their livelihoods and fallen into debt, depression, addiction, or all three. A light at the end of this long, dark tunnel would do a lot to boost morale and as an expert virologist, Fauci would have a number for us to strive for so that we can get back to normal.

He didn’t have that number. He didn’t offer to get that number. It’s almost like he didn’t want to give us that number.

The truth is, we need that number. Keeping the finish line vague doesn’t indicate that we’ll be out of this mess anytime soon and will only serve to demoralize people. We have nothing to work toward and Americans need something to work toward. It’s in our national character. However, after over a year, we’re still in this holding power that is benefiting no one except the people keeping us in it.

For all intents and purposes, the pandemic seems to be over. Rates are declining, many hospitals are empty, and despite many states returning to normal in as many ways as possible, a resurgence of the virus hasn’t happened. Vaccine distribution is seeing thousands and thousands vaccinated every day, yet people like Fauci still claim that we’re nowhere near ready to give the all-clear on this national emergency.

Paul’s question on Fauci’s insistence on masking up even after you’ve been vaccinated also wasn’t necessarily a political question, but it became one when Fauci didn’t have an answer for Paul. When Paul asked him to present the study that says we have to wear two masks despite being vaccinated, Fauci didn’t present one.

“You parade around in two masks for show! You can’t get it again!” said Paul. “There’s virtually a zero percent chance you’re going to get it and yet you’re telling people that have the vaccine, who have immunity — you’re defying everything we know about immunity by telling people to wear masks who have been vaccinated.”

In both of these situations, Paul and Jordan were asking very simple, very logical questions, and highlighting the logistical gaps in Fauci’s positions. Neither time was Fauci able to explain himself in a way that filled in those gaps.

Fauci called it a “show,” but so did Paul and it’s Paul who seems to be using the term more accurately. Neither Paul nor Jordan are being extreme but they are asking questions that only extremists would find inconvenient.

Here’s the more disturbing part. The questions Paul and Jordan asked were questions being asked by millions of Americans. Americans aren’t extremists for wanting to take their masks off after becoming immune to the virus. They’re not extremists for wanting a firm objective for success.

If Paul and Jordan are extreme, then we all are, but one has to wonder if we’re extreme or if the people lying to us, leading us via falsehoods, and holding onto power that doesn’t belong to them are the extremists.