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The Difference Between Taking Offense and Racism

Mike Ehrmann/Pool Photo via AP

This article is going to be written around the definition of racism as it is, not as the yahoos in the halls of universities and the cesspools of online social media would define it, because that definition is stupid.

To be clear, the real definition of racism is:

  • The belief that race accounts for differences in human character or ability, and that a particular race is superior to others.
  • Discrimination or prejudice based on race.

Whereas the definition of racism according to the social justice outrage brigades is:

  • Racism = Prejudice + Power

Their definition is effectively a way for the social justice-obsessed to be racist themselves with a clean conscience and an excuse when called out for it. It’s lazy, it’s stupid, and a lot of people buy it…but I digress. We’re going with the real definition of racism.

There’s another thing we need to get completely clear about: what racism isn’t. It’s not the offense taken by any given person. To explain what I mean by this, I’m going to look at the concept of “microaggressions.”

Microaggressions, according to the denizens of the social justice nuthouse, is the act of being racist without meaning to be racist. For instance, if you ask an Asian person where they’re from, that’s considered a microaggression because it assumes that the person you’re asking is less of an American than you. It’s “othering,” as the SocJus newspeak goes.

Only it’s not racist. It’s asking, with innocent curiosity, what part of Asia someone’s family descends from. Asian people are very diverse and taking an interest in someone’s family story is the furthest thing from rude, unless you have malicious intent behind finding out that information, which the vast majority of this entire country does not have.

Oddly enough, assuming minorities in America can’t figure out how to work a computer or obtain/use an ID card for any reason isn’t considered racist or a microaggression, but then again, no self-respecting, leftist white savior would ever consider their own soft bigotry a problem. Their intentions are pure as the driven snow, after all.

It’s so pure that they can take offense on behalf of minority communities and even create non-offensive terms to describe them, whether that specific minority community wants to be described that word or not *cough* Latinx *cough*…but again, I digress.

It’s that offense that people take for next to any reason at all that, for the left, immediately makes someone guilty of racism. Whether you intended to be racist or not, if offense is taken by someone, then it was racist. There’s no nuance, no arguments — you’re racist. Period. End of story.

Only it’s not the end of the story. In fact, there’s no story to begin with.

Whether or not someone is racist isn’t up to the person who was offended. Whether or not an action was racist isn’t up to the offended. It’s literally up to the definition. Malicious intent or a sense of superiority is first needed for something to be racist. A royal family member innocently wondering what color of skin a baby will have isn’t racism; it’s honest curiosity. Saying that someone can’t comment on matters of racism because of their skin color (a criticism I get from the left often) is racism.

Assuming that because someone is black that they won’t know how to obtain an ID card is racism, because it assumes that a person is dumb because of the melanin levels of their skin. Recognizing and seeking to solve a crisis at the Southern border because it increases some of the worst crimes in the nation is not racist.

Being offended happens to everyone, but weaponizing being offended is evil and creates far more problems in terms of race relations, relationships between the sexes, the gay community and the church, and more. There are issues, but proclaiming that offense is proof of horrible qualities in a person only exacerbates these issues in our society.

In truth, offense is the problem of the offended, not the offender, as the offender oftentimes fell into it by mistake, and a mistake should not be automatically labeled as intent.