Marco Rubio Comes Back Swinging at the Media After His John Lewis Photo Mistake

FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2018, file photo, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks at a news conference to discuss Paid Family Leave legislation, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Rubio and Jeff Flake threatened on Sunday, Oct. 14, tough punitive action by Congress against Saudi Arabia, including a possible halt of military sales, if it's proven that Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed inside the country's consulate in Istanbul. Saudi Arabia is warning of possible economic retaliation of its own if the U.S. acts. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Florida Senator Marco Rubio embarrassed himself nationally after he posted a picture of himself shaking hands with Elijah Cummings while honoring the recently passed John Lewis.

To be sure, the mistake was one that shouldn’t have been made and isn’t a good look on multiple levels. However, as Rubio pointed out, it’s not exactly a mistake he’s made by himself. In fact, the very people giddily attacking him over his mistake have made the exact same mistake before.

And Rubio kindly reminded them.

CNN made it an entire segment on New Day, with Brian Stelter insinuating that Rubio’s misidentifying Lewis as Cummings was a stupid and easily avoidable mistake that he hopes Rubio and his team have learned from. CNN figures laughed and shook their head as they spoke about it.

Hilariously, what they forgot (or hope you forgot) was that they themselves are guilty of the same exact thing, and not even that long ago.

“Rubio posted pictures of the same mistake being made, including one made by CNN’s New Day,” tweeted Rubio. “Never post a photo unless it has been verified as accurate by a major media outlet such as @CNN These people are trained professionals who never make mistakes such as using the wrong photo or misidentifying someone.” 

Ouch.

To be clear, this isn’t a mistake that should be made by anybody but mistakes do happen, and this specific problem of mistaking Cummings with Lewis seems to happen more often than others. That said, if the media wants to comment on the speck of sawdust in the eyes of others, it should probably see to the plank in its own first.

The media has no right to be as judgemental as it is but as I’ve made clear, the media isn’t interested in reporting the news, it’s more interested in pushing a political narrative. This goes double, if not triple, for CNN.

(READ: Remember That the Media Is a Business With a Vested Interest in Disaster, Not a Service)