Sarah Silverman Nails Cancel Culture for Exactly What It Is

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2016, file photo, Sarah Silverman arrives at the 22nd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Shrine Auditorium & Expo Hall in Los Angeles. Silverman said in a Facebook post on July 7, 2016, she underwent surgery recently for epiglottitis and spent a week in the intensive care unit. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

 

Once again, a slam of cancel culture comes from a left-wing location: Sarah Silverman.

Comedy used to be quite the open plain. Performers spoke what they wished and let the crowd decide what was funny. Nowadays, the audience is choosing something else: what’s allowed to be said.

And often, it isn’t even the audience; it’s people who are outside looking in.

More than that, it seems to me, the problem with people being so triggered by so many jokes is that so many don’t believe in…jokes.

To every person, surely some things are sacred; but generally, if you’re taking a joke seriously, you’re largely missing the point.

And these days, if someone generates the wrong jest or rattles off the wrong remark or is wracked with the wrong past…they can be #Canceled.

Speaking to Christian Picciolini recently, comedian Sarah offered quite the term for cancel culture’s virulent virtue signaling.

As noted by The Daily Wire, Christian’s not your average chap — he’s a former neo-Nazi.

On her podcast last week, Sarah praised her guest for changing his ways:

“Christian Picciolini, my friend, who was a neo-Nazi for years, since he was 14 to, you know, into his 20s, late 20s maybe, was the head of a neo-Nazi, whatever, KKK chapter where he lived. He has spent the last 30 years getting people out of hate groups. That’s what he does. But he went towards love. He was 14, he was smoking a joint, and an older kid took the joint out of his hand and threw it out and said, ‘You don’t need that stuff, man.’”

That same person who steered him from drugs invited him into a nefarious bunch:

“And that was a hate group, a neo-Nazi group, where he found family, camaraderie, and a place to be when both of his parents worked all day.”

Silverman theorized such organizations are the result — perhaps ironically — of people looking for love:

“Going towards love can be a hate group, it could be the drama club. But that’s all it is at its root. It’s just going towards where the love is. And you’re going to find yourself doing it a lot, all through your life, and maybe wonder about it.”

Sarah believes cancel culture pushes people toward such sorts:

“In this cancel culture, and we all know what I’m talking about — whether you think there is one or there isn’t one or where you stand on it, and there’s a lot of gray matter there — but without a path to redemption, when you take someone, you found a tweet they wrote seven years ago or a thing that they said and you expose it and you say, ‘This person should be no more. Banish them forever.’ They’re going to find some place where they are accepted.”

Sarah pointed out that everyone needs a chance to be redeemed:

“If we don’t give these people a path to redemption, then they’re going to go where they are accepted, which is the motherf***ing dark side. I think there should be some kind of path — do we want people to be changed? Or do we want them to stay the same, to freeze in a moment we found on the internet from 12 years ago? And so we can point to ourselves as right and them as wrong.”

Then she nailed what cancel culture is.

Ladies and gentleman, Sarah Silverman being right as rain:

“It’s righteousness porn.”

It’s not the first time the performer’s canned the #culture.

In September of last year, she was asked if she’d like to host the Emmys.

Her reply:

“No. Nobody wants to do it, either. I mean, it’s thankless.”

Sounds about right.

Hopefully, culture can forge a path less pornographic. Because our current contagion of righteous porn…isn’t righteous at all.

-ALEX

 

See more pieces from me:

Brett Favre Pegs Politics and Professional Sports, but Is Patriotism Politics, Too?

More Sense, Less Insanity: Ice Cube Avoids Typecasting, Gives Great Advice for Life After the Election

Of Course: America’s First Known Murder Hornet Nest Appears, and It’s Big as a Basketball

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