Diamond and Silk Stumble Over False Claim to House Judiciary Committee

They’ve made a name for themselves with audacious videos, a lot of head-swiveling, eye-rolling, and lip-smacking, in service to Donald Trump.

Yes. We get it. You’re sassy and you’ve got an a-ti-tude.

The “they” in question would be the MAGA-pimping duo, Diamond and Silk (real names: Lynette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson).

The pair appeared before the House Judiciary Committee today and claimed, among other things, that they have never been paid by the Trump campaign for their work.

That’s great – if you ignore federal campaign finance filings that show something completely different.

“We have never been paid by the Trump campaign,” Lynette Hardaway, who goes by Diamond, told Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas).

In fact, the Federal Election Commission lists a filing from the Trump campaign to Diamond and Silk on November 22, 2016 for “field consulting,” to the tune of $1,275.

Just as a footnote, FEC filings also show they were paid a total of $7,025 for “online advertising” for disgraced candidate, Paul Nehlen.

When the FEC filings were pointed out to them by Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, they brushed it off as reimbursement for airfare to a campaign event, in spite of what the FEC filing lists.

“We are familiar with that particular lie, we can see that you do look at fake news,” said Rochelle Richardson, the other half of Diamond and Silk, when the New York Democrat brought up the FEC receipt.

“I’m just trying to figure out who is lying here,” Jeffries said.

It’s not “fake news” to point out an actual filing on official campaign documents, but then, nobody is employing Diamond and Silk for their intellectual heft.

The pair were invited to appear today by House Republicans, in order to testify about the alleged bias across social media outlets of conservatives.

They claimed earlier in the testimony that the absence of Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg at the hearing proved his guilt.

Zuckerberg appeared several weeks ago to give testimony.

Diamond and Silk’s “expertise” on this matter comes from receiving a message on their Facebook page citing their videos as “unsafe content.”

Facebook later issued a statement saying the warning was sent in error.