Trump Signals Tough New Gun Regulations and He Expects the NRA to Approve

In this Jan. 4, 2013 photo, handguns are displayed in the sales area of Sandy Springs Gun Club and Range, in Sandy Springs, Ga. In Connecticut and Colorado, scenes of the most deadly U.S. mass shootings in 2012, people were less enthusiastic about buying new guns at the end of the year than in most other states, according to an Associated Press analysis of new FBI data. The biggest surges in background checks for people who want to carry or buy guns occurred in states in the South and West. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)

President Trump is pushing for limitations on gun ownership, and he’s expecting the NRA to fall in line behind him, rather than the people who support them.

In an interview with Fox News sycophant, Judge Jeanine Pirro on Saturday night, the president suggested that a plan was coming together that would put new restrictions on age and mental wellness, as well as tightening background checks on those attempting to purchase firearms.

From Bloomberg:

“There’s no bigger champion than I am for the Second Amendment,” Trump said in an interview Saturday with Fox News’ Jeanine Pirro, in which he also restated his support for arming as many as 20 percent of teachers as a way to deter school shooters.

“I think you’re going to have tremendous support,” for a plan he said the White House is drawing up. Trump also suggested he favors a combination of new gun limits and “offensive” approaches such as the controversial call to arm teachers. “It’s time. I think the NRA’s going to be for it.”

I don’t actually have a problem with allowing teachers or school staff to go through proper training and to carry concealed weapons.

I think it should be voluntary, however, and up to the states. I also believe that concealed carry should be just that – concealed – and that those who are carrying not advertise if they have a weapon, or not. Just take down all the “gun-free zone” signs at schools and strongly “hint” to the public that potential school shooters will not have the soft target they expect, should they come calling.

The president will be calling for a bipartisan sit-down to discuss potential further legislation on guns, and he knows he’ll be pushing against the NRA, who gave him a hearty endorsement in the 2016 election.

“It’s time to get it done and get it done right,” the president said of gun legislation. “Somebody who’s mentally ill should not have a weapon, should not have a gun.”

That might be a problem.

Certainly, you don’t want violent sociopaths with access to weapons, but where do you draw the line?

Trump isn’t stopping there, however. He’s also looking into restraining orders as a measure for confiscating guns from those deemed “dangerous.”

The government gets to decide who’s “dangerous,” by the way.

There are already “red flag laws” that say those considered extreme risk can have their weapons confiscated.

How Trump’s proposal would differ is unknown. Sources say the White House is considering an Indiana version of the law.

At the White House on Thursday, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi described to Trump similar efforts underway in her state to allow law enforcement to seize firearms from someone who is deemed to be a danger to themselves or others.

“Good,” Trump responded.

That may be a bit of a problem, for some.

Certainly, the Parkland shooter, Nikolas Cruz, gave enough red flags to warrant action, but many others exhibit little, other than “odd,” or aloof behavior.

I’m of the belief that there are things that can be done, but if the government starts confiscating guns from citizens before any wrongdoing, what do those optics say?