New Poll: Would It Be Appropriate to Fire Robert Mueller?

FILE - In this April 21, 2016 file photo, attorney and former FBI Director Robert Mueller, right, arrives for a court hearing at the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco. Mueller has been overseeing settlement talks with Volkswagen, the U.S. government and private lawyers. Mueller is being honored with an award from West Point. The U.S. Military Academy’s Association of Graduates will present the Thayer Award to Mueller on Thursday evening, Oct. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)

While the talk of President Trump firing special counsel Robert Mueller is still just in the phase of consideration, with no solid indicators that he intends to move that way, that was the subject of a recent Politico/Morning Consult poll.

The question at hand: Would it be appropriate for President Trump to fire Robert Mueller?

A majority of Americans polled say “No.”

Forty-eight percent of those polled say it would be inappropriate for the president to step in and fire Mueller in the middle of an investigation, with only 22 percent saying it would be appropriate.

Breaking that down across partisan lines, it runs about as expected.

A majority of Democrats, 67 percent, says it would be inappropriate to fire Mueller, compared to just 11 percent who think the opposite.

Only 29 percent of Republicans say it would be inappropriate, compared to 37 percent who say it would be an appropriate move to fire Mueller.

And while there is a full third of voters polled who either aren’t sure or haven’t formed an opinion, 40 percent of those polled approve of how Mueller is conducting the investigation. Only 27 percent disapprove.

Trump has pushed hard against Mueller’s investigation, even lashing out at Attorney General Jeff Sessions for recusing himself and not preventing the hiring of Mueller, but at the time of Sessions’ recusal, there was no special investigation. That came after Trump went on national TV and announced to the world that he’d just fired FBI Director James Comey to stop the Russia investigation.

He can’t get out of his own way.

This particular poll was conducted from July 20 to July 24, with 3,981 registered voter respondents. It has a margin of error of 2 percent.