Democratic Representative Pushes "Day Of Reason" To Counter National Day Of Prayer

For some reason, I can’t stop thinking of a particular “South Park” episode and otters.

A Democrat Representative from (Where else?) California, Ted Lieu is attempting to counter the National Day of Prayer with what he’s calling the National Day of Reason.

In a resolution Lieu has put forth, he’s hoping to distract from any silly notions about prayer and faith, in order to get people to focus on climate change (weather) and matters of “reason and logic.”

The resolution encourages people to use the day to focus on “the employment of reason, critical thought, the scientific method and free inquiry to the resolution of human problems and for the welfare of humankind.”

“There is no doubt that emotions and passions play an important role in American politics,” Lieu said in a statement linked to the tweet.

“They drive elected officials to pursue issues they care about and energize our citizens to participate in our great democracy. But as Jon Oliver said, ‘graphs aren’t Rorschach tests.’”

That’s all well and good, but why push it on the exact same day as the National Day of Prayer?

The reason is because this has less to do with celebrating science and reason, and everything to do with opposing people of faith.

The American Humanist Association and Washington Area Secular Humanists, which launched NationalDayofReason.org, claim the National Day of Prayer violates the First Amendment of the Constitution by asking federal and local government officials to set aside tax dollar-supported time and space to engage in religious ceremonies.

The National Day of Reason, the site says, is a day to raise public awareness about the persistent threat to religious liberty posed by government intrusion into the private sphere of worship.

That’s a whole lot of bunk devised to make it appear as if they actually care about saving money for taxpayers.

And no, the National Day of Prayer doesn’t call for the shutdown of government, in order to participate in religious ceremonies. It recognizes the importance of prayer in the lives of Americans, and some events do take place, but nothing far out of the realm of what normally goes on from day to day in this nation and with our government.

These otters would be so much easier to stomach if they’d at least say what they mean, rather than beating around the bush.