WATCH: GOP Rep Makes A Strong Statement To Young Syrian Girl About Tuesday's Chemical Attack In Syria

This really is heartbreaking.

Personally, I haven’t been able to look at all the pictures that have been released from Tuesday’s gas attack in Syria.

Yes, the media will use the most gut-wrenching shots imaginable, in order to get a visceral response from the viewers, but there’s no denying it was awful.

Syria’s Bashar al-Assad used chemical warfare against his own citizens, and scores of little ones, with red, swollen faces, and eyes large, as they desperately fight for air were splashed all over news reports.

In 2012, then-President Obama drew a rhetorical “red line” against Assad’s use of chemical weapons, in his fight against rebels, and then he pretty much forgot about it.

Appearing on CNN’s “New Day” this morning, Republican Representative Adam Kinzinger (Ill.) responded to a video message from a 7-year old Syrian girl, who said she wanted Syrian children to just be able to play and go to school.

When asked to respond to the little girl, Kinzinger offered:

“I’m ashamed of our government’s actions so far and inaction. I wish I had the ability to move forces to do what needs to be done,” Kinzinger said.

“What I would tell to her is ‘Look, people are paying attention. The problem is we need more people to pay attention and get past our fear of action because of what we felt the wars have been like in the past.'”

Kinzinger said this is an issue of a “terrible humanitarian crisis.”

“These are all kids that want to be teachers, that want to be doctors, they want to be police officers,” he said.

“They dream of having a family of their own someday. And an evil dictator named Bashar al-Assad decides that it is to his political advantage to put chemical weapons in their face and choke them to death.”

Until the western world stands up, whether that be Republican or Democratic administrations, this “is going to continue,” he said.

And he’s not wrong.

When Obama issued his “red line,” it sounded tough, but the follow-up did not correspond with the tough words. His lead-from-behind approach may work for the quivering souls of academia and the Hollywood jet-set that he valued so much, but in real world actions, it proved worthless.

So far, the Trump administration has not said what the next plan of action may be, but the president did call the attack “reprehensible,” and he’s right.

It’s time to get allies on board and demand Assad go. Then, that is to be followed up with appropriate actions.