Trump Ready To "Make A Deal" With Democrats To Get Healthcare Bill Passed

Because of course he will.

President Trump reiterated his willingness to work with Democrats and punish conservatives, in regards to making Obamacare replacement a thing.

In an interview published in Sunday’s Financial Times, Trump offered:

“If we don’t get what we want, we will make a deal with the Democrats and we will have — in my opinion — not as good a form of healthcare, but we are going to have a very good form of healthcare and it will be a bipartisan form of healthcare,” Trump said during the interview when asked if he would try to recruit Democrats to support future health care legislation.

It’s going to take some of that great deal making that Trump claims to be known for to make that happen.

Democrats will not want their Golden Boy, Barack Obama’s signature legislation touched.

That, and the fact that the ones who haven’t gotten campaign contributions from Trump for years pretty much can’t stand him.

As for Republicans, the moderate squishes may be a bit more malleable, but the more conservative Republicans were the roadblock that kept the first attempt to replace a no-go.

The House Freedom Caucus stood firm, preferring a clean repeal, over what they saw as just nips and tucks to Obamacare, which didn’t go far enough to lower premiums.

The bill was pulled last week after Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan failed to convince the HFC members to give their support.

Trump’s response was to take to Twitter and threaten to primary those conservatives, such as Justin Amash and Mark Meadows, who didn’t fall in line.

He further said in the Financial Times interview:

“Well I will get the Democrats if I go the second way. The second way, which I hate to see, then the Freedom Caucus loses so big and I hate to see that, because  … our plan is going to be a very good plan. When I say our plan, not phase one just: phase one, two and three added up is a great plan …” said Trump.

Not a wise plan by Trump.

For starters, the Obamacare replacement bill had less than 20 percent support. The nation’s Republican voters, for most part, wanted a repeal, rather than a revamped Obamacare bill.

Also, the conservative lawmakers Trump is targeting are more popular in their home states than he is. While his approval ratings dip, their principled stand has only helped the HFC members image as fighters.

Trump may get his Obamacare replacement, yet, and he may even get Democrats on board, but if this looks more like a Democrat bill than what conservatives have pushed for, it’s not the House Freedom Caucus that will be in trouble.