Poor Sales Forced Nordstrom To Drop Ivanka Trump Fashion Line

Ivanka Trump, daughter of Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump, takes the stage during the final day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Donald Trump wants everyone to know what a good businessman he is.

In fact, that’s one of the arguments most used by his devotees during the run up to the election. His business experience would make him a good president (we’ll put aside that business and politics have only the most minimal resemblance to each other).

Closer to reality is that he is a known businessman, but the series of bankruptcies and failed business ventures makes the claim of “good” rather dubious.

All that taken into consideration, even a semi-successful businessman should be able to tell you that if a product isn’t selling, you stop trying to push it.

That’s exactly what happened with Nordstrom and Ivanka Trump’s fashion line.

On Wednesday of this week, after Nordstrom announced they were dropping Ivanka’s line, her dad, President Trump, tweeted out his dissatisfaction.

And I can allow that he was just being a protective father, but he’s no longer just a private citizen. He is president of the United States, and his words carry a certain amount of weight.

Nordstrom is a business, and they have to do what is right for their company and their shareholders.

According to internal store data, continuing to feature Ivanka Trump’s fashion line was not in the best interest of the company.

The brand’s sales dropped 32 percent overall for the year, the report said.

The first daughter’s merchandise sales at Nordstrom fell more than 70 percent during the second, third and fourth weeks of October, during the heat of the brutal presidential race, compared to the same time last year.

Nordstrom’s refusal to carry Trump’s brand sparked a flurry of criticism this week, with President Trump and other top White House figures coming to Ivanka’s defense.

Kellyanne Conway got herself in hot water this week, as well, for breaching a federal ethics law and saying on “Fox and Friends” that people should go out and buy Ivanka’s line of clothing.

A good businessman would recognize that it’s not personal, and respect the company’s business model.

Trump didn’t, and reactionary Trump fans began to call for a boycott of Nordstrom.

Here’s my thought: Why weren’t you at Nordstrom buying enough of Ivanka’s clothing line to keep it in demand?

You can’t afford to shop at Nordstrom, you say?

Then go ahead and boycott. You apparently weren’t a customer, anyway, so continuing to not get the business they weren’t getting before probably isn’t going to hurt them.