Glenn Beck Mirrors the Grief of Many Ted Cruz Supporters

Glenn Beck introduces Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, during a campaign event at the Johnson County Fairgrounds, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016 in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Glenn Beck was one of Ted Cruz’s more ardent and vocal surrogates during the primaries.

He was also one of Trump’s most fierce critics.

Upon hearing the news on Friday that Ted Cruz had reversed his position, amid pressure from donors and concerns for his political future, Beck took to Facebook to express his feelings over the announcement.

I’d say he encompassed what most of Cruz’s supporters felt – many of whom took Cruz’s convention speech, where he told voters to vote their conscience as a rallying cry against party politics and the bloated, liberal charlatan currently serving as GOP nominee.

“[This is] a profoundly sad day for me,” he wrote on Facebook. “Disappointment does not begin to describe.

“Maybe it is time to go to the mountains for a while,” the conservative commentator added. “Again, disappointment doesn’t even begin to describe my feelings.”

“America is an idea, not a country,” he said. “When we discuss the destruction of our country, that is vastly different than the destruction of an idea. I fear the idea is already lost, due to the panic of losing one’s comfort and country.

“The founders meant it much differently when they said: join or die. Welcome to the big tent. GOP / DNC 2016 join or die. Long live the idea of the republic.”

No doubt, Cruz’s timing for his announcement may have been purposeful.

The weekend will give talk radio personalities like Beck an opportunity to absorb, consider, and then on Monday, the talk will be more reflective than reactionary.

For supporters, especially those who saw Cruz as a white knight, unsullied by politics, and the defender of the noble cause of conservatism and conscience, it may take several weekends before it settles in that the suit of armor was just a suit of gabardine. He really is just a politician, and this is his job.

They won’t like it any better.

Believe me. I’ve been there.

They’ll learn to deal with it, however.

If there is to be any good to come from his depressing election cycle, let’s hope that rather than being completely disillusioned, voters instead turn their disappointment and frustration into action. This nation was meant to be a citizen government, anyway.

Instead of looking for political heroes, let the people become motivated in attending everything from school board meetings to presidential town halls, demanding accountability, asking questions, writing letters to their congressmen, and vetting every man or woman that seeks their vote with unwavering dedication to uncovering every fact.

There are still good and principled men and women in politics, but there are none perfect. The sooner we all grasp that, the sooner we can put this behind us and start again.