Cuba Just Spit On Obama's New Era of U.S.-Cuban Relations

Cuban President Raul Castro, right, lifts up the arm of President Barack Obama at the conclusion of their joint news conference at the Palace of the Revolution, Monday, March 21, 2016, in Havana, Cuba. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

So much for that newfound bond between America and Obama’s new bff, Raul Castro.

From the Washington Examiner today:

Cuba is refusing to approve visa applications for members of the U.S. House Homeland Security Committee, according to the committee’s chairman.

Members were hoping to leave on Friday afternoon to examine lagging security in the country’s airports, which are set to begin making flights to the U.S. this year. The lawmakers were forced to cancel when their applications were denied that morning.

Yes, at the end of 2014 President Obama announced he was ending the “failed Cold war-era policies” of the past and that we’d be entering into a new era of mutual understanding and partnership with the Communist stronghold.

Social media lit up with cozy photo-ops of Raul Castro, and our own little despot, Barack Obama at baseball games, posing in front of murals of “Che” Guevara, and basically disrespecting the memory of far better leaders, who recognized the threat of allowing a man like Castro to maintain legitimacy.

Upon opening up relations, Cuba’s first call was for the return of Guantanamo Bay, which would require the relocation of the facility that now houses some of the worst of the worst in the war on terror. The Obama administration has previously recommended bringing them here, and has quietly released many others, many of whom have gone on to rejoin the war against our nation.

This latest insult is a thumb in the eye of America, as Cuba senses weakness and an unwillingness by this administration, as well as the next, to offer any resistance. This is a given, considering Clinton will be an extension of Obama’s disastrously failed policies and Trump has already stated that he “loves Cuba” and has no problem with a relationship with them.

“We wanted to look at their airport security … because TSA has been backchanneling to us that it’s not adequate,” said Chairman Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas. “So I attempted to go down there to just look at them, there were five of us, and they denied our visas.”

Officials say Cuba is set to begin making 110 daily flights into the U.S. from 10 airports in the country this fall, but lack security measures that include scanners and bomb-sniffing dogs.

It seems a very simple request, under the circumstances.

McCaul noted that drugs already make it into the U.S. on planes coming from countries like Puerto Rico, which have security superior to Cuba. “If you can get drugs on a plane, you can get a bomb on a plane,” McCaul said.

A suspension of flights to and from Cuba needs to be immediate, until the time that Castro’s regime actually shows a willingness to cooperate, but nobody should expect President Obama to press the issue.