Impeachment Trial: An Open Letter to Pierre Delecto, Alias Willard “Mitt” Romney

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, waits to participate in a mock swearing-in ceremony in the Old Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019, as the 116th Congress begins. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

[Background: “Pierre Delecto” was an anonymous Twitter account that was infamous for anti-Trump commentary. Eventually, it was determined that the account belonged to Mitt Romney, which of course explains everything. This article puts the peculiar story in the best possible light for Romney. Final note: I guess I don’t blame him for landing on “Mitt” as his trademark moniker with a given name like “Willard.” He would definitely want to bury the hick-sounding name in order to better socialize with Establishment Republicans.]

Dear Pierre,

I was once a good Republican who never violated Ronald Reagan’s Eleventh Commandment, “Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.” After the George W. Bush administration, I began to break that law with increasing frequency. One of the first to suffer my scorn was John McCain after his lackluster 2008 presidential campaign gifted us one of the worst presidents in US history, leftist Barack Hussein Obama. McCain continued to be a recipient of my scorn until his death in 2018 for a variety of reasons, including rubbing elbows with Syrian terrorists (caught in pictures) and of course passing the Steele dossier to the FBI.

Then there is you. I was not particularly enthusiastic about your selection as the Republican Establishment’s presidential candidate for the 2012 election, especially in light of your performance as the RINO governor of Massachusetts during which time you gave a “test-drive” for a state version of Obamacare, which Ezekiel Emanuel (brother to the despicable Rahm) copied and expanded into the Affordable Care Act – which of course was a misnomer if there ever was one.

Be that as it may, as a good Republican, I swallowed my concerns in 2012 and got on board the Romney train because it was my belief that the country was ready to terminate Obama’s presidency with prejudice because of the damage that he had done to the country in four short years (ballooned the national debt, exacerbated racial divisions, politicized federal agencies, and destroyed US foreign policy – particularly in the Middle East).

And you should have been able to mop the floor with him, especially after the Benghazi debacle, during which Obama was physically absent during the key 13-hour period in which four Americans including the US ambassador were killed by Islamic terrorists. You were completely silent when Hillary Clinton and Obama’s minions blatantly lied about the cause of the attack (a “video”), and you refused to press Obama on that topic during the 2012 presidential debates. In fact, your performances during the debates were disgraceful – the classic weak-kneed decorum that we conservatives have come to despise from RINOs and Establishment Republicans in general. Obama was open to political attacks on many subjects, but you chose to play the role of “patrician politician” and refused to fight for the job.

The fact that you let Obama slide on Benghazi, in particular, convinced me that you were just another wheel in the Uniparty’s cog, and in retrospect, a Romney presidency wouldn’t have been that much better, as the Uniparty’s corruption would have continued apace under slightly different management.

You disappeared off the political radar screen until after Candidate Donald J. Trump shocked the nation when he was elected president – and probably you, too, since you refused to support him during the 2016 campaign. You do remember this Politico article, don’t you, Pierre?

However, you decided to toss your hat into the ring for the Secretary of State job in the new Trump Administration. How disingenuous is that after refusing to support him during the campaign? But, of course, that didn’t work out so well when you lost the job because you refused to apologize for your anti-Trump comments during the campaign.

But that didn’t stop you from asking for the President’s endorsement in your 2018 campaign to replace Orrin Hatch as a Republican senator for Utah, did it? And despite your continuing anti-Trump attitude and unwillingness to apologize for your comments, the President graciously endorsed your candidacy, which you accepted, as this article notes.

And now that you are the junior senator from Utah, how do you repay that gratitude? By essentially taking the baton from the deceased John McCain as the most vocal anti-Trump Republican in the US Senate. According to Conservapedia, one of my go-to sources for information on various people and topics, “conservatives see Romney’s core beliefs as only marginally different from that of globalist Democrats such as Obama … Romney constantly engages in a never-ending series of scurrilous criticisms of Trump, much as fellow Mormon Senator Jeff Flake [R-AZ] did until public disapproval of his positions forced him to forgo running for reelection.”

But your most despicable act to date was to vote with the Senate Democrats for more witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial. You did so with the full knowledge that you are not representing the wishes of not only Republicans in general, of whom 97% support the President (a previously unheard-of number), but also of the voters in your own state, of whom 57% are against his impeachment as of 25 January. What do you think those numbers in Utah are now that people have watched the farce that was the House managers’ case, with no presentation of direct evidence and nothing but lies, innuendo, and insults – including to senators like you! – emanating from the House managers’ mouths? Not to mention the devastating presentations from the President’s team that completely eviscerated the Democrats’ arguments for conviction. But then you couldn’t do the right thing, could you? You put your petty personal concerns over those of the people you represent. I think the people of Utah will come for you soon, as my colleague Mike Ford opines.

I used to naïvely believe that wealthy and accomplished people inherently deserved my respect. The older I get, the more I realize that that was yet another one of my foolish notions. You are living proof that wealth can’t buy good character, decency, or morality. The reality is that you are a very small man – shameful, vindictive, and self-serving to a fault. If you had a bone of decency in your body, you’d resign in disgrace and remove yourself from public life forever.

With no respect whatsoever,

Stu Cvrk

A lifelong Republican and resident of the great state of South Dakota

P.S. The people at CPAC were reading my mind; this is poetic justice for you, Pierre: