Robert Mueller's Whining About Roger Stone Not Going to Prison Is the Kind of Unmanly Behavior We've Come to Expect From Him

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller is back in the news. In a Washington Post op-ed, the weapon of choice of leftwing Washington elites, titled Robert Mueller: Roger Stone remains a convicted felon, and rightly so, Mueller attacks the decision by President Trump to commute the sentence of Roger Stone.

Let me say up front that you can hold the view that Roger Stone is a noxious sh**bag and society would mostly benefit from him spending a long time in prison and, at the same time, think that he was singled out for an abusive prosecution because Mueller’s team was gunning for President Trump, thought Stone was a central figure, and then figured out they’d been suckered by a Stone’s self-promoting statements.

By the way, Harmeet Dhillon has this right. If you saw Mueller the stumblebum in action before the House, you know he did not write this op-ed.

The work of the special counsel’s office — its report, indictments, guilty pleas and convictions — should speak for itself. But I feel compelled to respond both to broad claims that our investigation was illegitimate and our motives were improper, and to specific claims that Roger Stone was a victim of our office. The Russia investigation was of paramount importance. Stone was prosecuted and convicted because he committed federal crimes. He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so.

There are two correct statements here. Fist, the Special Counsel’s record does speak for itself. It is one of vindictive partisanship leavened with monstrous, though, comical stupidity and ineptitude. The reason that Mueller is pissed off about a sentence commutation is that his investigation is a barking shambles. Michael Flynn is about to be exonerated, and that prosecution has been shown to be deeply corrupt. His big indictment, of a Russian company, was dismissed, and Mueller’s team should have been ordered by the judge to wear clown hats and reimburse the nation for the cost of the proceedings. And yes, Stone remains a convicted felon, but a free one and one who will not suffer for the experience and who will undoubtedly monetize it.

Following FBI Director James B. Comey’s termination in May 2017, the acting attorney general named me as special counsel and directed the special counsel’s office to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. The order specified lines of investigation for us to pursue, including any links or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign. One of our cases involved Stone, an official on the campaign until mid-2015 and a supporter of the campaign throughout 2016. Stone became a central figure in our investigation for two key reasons: He communicated in 2016 with individuals known to us to be Russian intelligence officers, and he claimed advance knowledge of WikiLeaks’ release of emails stolen by those Russian intelligence officers.

By the time Mueller was appointed, all of the FBI and Justice knew the underlying allegations, such as they were, were an utter sham and the sole purpose of Mueller’s investigation was to either so damage President Trump that he could not govern or provide political cover for an impeachment attempt. Before Mueller’s first day in the office, it was known that Flynn was innocent, and Steele’s dossier was fake. FISA warrants that were in effect on Carter Page showed that there was no coordination between any Russian official or intelligence operative and the Trump campaign. And, whoever has their hand up Mueller’s butt and is using him as a sock puppet lies here:

We did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired with the Russian government in its activities. The investigation did, however, establish that the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome. It also established that the campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts.

Actually, it has never been proven, and no evidence has ever been presented, that backs up the claim that the Russians wanted anything more than to sow discord, an objective to which Mueller cooperated mightily. And ‘expecting to benefit’ from an action of a third party is hardly a crime.

We made every decision in Stone’s case, as in all our cases, based solely on the facts and the law and in accordance with the rule of law. The women and men who conducted these investigations and prosecutions acted with the highest integrity. Claims to the contrary are false.

Charitably speaking, this is an infamous lie. You don’t send and FBI SWAT team to arrest a 67-year-old political consultant for lying to Congress when you can call his attorney and tell him that Stone has to surrender himself. You don’t tip CNN off to the show you’re putting on to play to the cheap seats. The only reason you do it is because you’re punishing the guy for punking the Special Counsel.

Any reading of the evidence indicates that Roger Stone’s communications with and about Wikileaks were utterly devoid of any relationship with that organization and calculated to make himself look more important than he was. It is hard to believe that even the collection of doofuses Mueller managed to assemble (to fully appreciate the imbecility of Mueller’s team read my colleague shipwreckedcrew’s epic Part Three On The Roger Stone Trial — Where Prosecutor Aaron Zelinsky Explains That He Didn’t Understand His Job) didn’t figure out that Stone was trash-talking as part of some grift he was working, in fact, I think that is precisely why they treated him like they did at his arrest.

Mueller’s op-ed is pretty much like his investigation; it is a fraud covering up another attempt to damage President Trump.