Just When the People In Benghazi Thought They Were Dead, This Amazing Thing Happened

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012 file photo, Libyan militias from towns throughout the country's west parade through Tripoli, Libya. The chaos unleashed by the Arab Spring has led to the rise of powerful militias across the Middle East, some allied with governments, others fighting to topple them and some -- like the Kurdish peshmerga in northern Iraq -- seen as vital Western allies. All could prove to be major obstacles to bringing peace or stability to the troubled region (AP Photo/Abdel Magid Al Fergany, File)

Just to briefly review the bidding, the tragedy in Benghazi was the makings of exactly one person. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. It was Clinton and her claque of post-menopausal biddies that came up with the idea of overthrowing Qaddafi because they could. I’ve long held that the entire Libyan venture had exactly one purpose: to prove that dictators could be overthown cheaply and without the involvement of the US military. By the time the Benghazi consulate was sacked and four Americans, including our ambassador, were dead, Libya had been embroiled in a low level civil war for over a year and a half. During that time, the State Department and the CIA had reached out to various and sundry militias and tried to co-opt them by providing training and arms. One of those militia groups was charged with providing security of the US consulate and annex in Benghazi.

When the attack began about 40 Americans were in the buildings.

The Libyan security people vanished.

Then this happened. A 50-vehicle motorcade arrived at the consulate. It consisted not only of trucks and cars but of technicals, the omnipresent Toyoto pickups with machineguns mounted on a pedestal in the truck bed. The Americans loaded themselves into the vehicles, bringing with them the body of slain consulate staffer Sean Smith, and they lit out for the airport. Who were these people?

The forces that arrived at the Annex shortly after the mortar attacks were able to transport all State Department and CIA personnel safely to the airport. The forces, known as Libyan Military Intelligence, arrived with 50 heavily-armed security vehicles. Libyan Military Intelligence was not part of the Libyan government, nor affiliated with any of the militias the CIA or State Department had developed a relationship with during the prior 18 months since the Libyan revolution took place. Instead, Libya Military Intelligence—whom the CIA did not even know existed until the night of the attacks—were comprised of former military officers under the Qadhafi regime who had gone into hiding in fear of being assassinated, and wanted to keep their presence in Benghazi as quiet as possible so as to not attract attention from the militias in control of Benghazi. In other words, some of the very individuals the United States had helped remove from power during the Libyan revolution were the only Libyans that came to the assistance of the United States on the night of the Benghazi attacks.

Not only were they regime loyalists, men who had been thrown out of power by the actions of Hillary Clinton, men whose very lives were in jeopardy because of her actions, they were men our CIA didn’t even know existed despite being on the ground in Libya for 18 months and men who stood up and took a great risk to rescue Americans.