[email protected] And Reporter [email protected] Continue To Lie About Ben Carson

Yesterday,  in the space of only a few hours, a cheap, dishonest attack on Ben Carson by POLITICO was beaten down. By the end of the day, not only had they changed their headline, they had surreptitiously re-written the story. One would have thought they would have learned their lesson about this kind of douchebaggery, but no. This is a left wing propaganda organ that has set out to destroy Ben Carson and they will not stop.

The latest edition is by a reporter named Eliza Collins, who looks to be about 8 years old

Eliza Collins at Politico headquarters in Arlington, VA on August 13, 2014. (John Shinkle/POLITICO​)
Eliza Collins at Politico headquarters in Arlington, VA on August 13, 2014. (John Shinkle/POLITICO​)

and has the reading comprehension skills of your typical lackwit. The headline is Ben Carson denies ever saying he received a ‘full scholarship’ to West Point and that is the last true thing that appears in the story.

Ben Carson, in an agitated press conference Friday night, denied that he had ever claimed receiving a “full scholarship” from West Point.

“I never said that I received a full scholarship. Nowhere did I say that,” Carson said. “POLITICO as you know, told a bold-faced lie.”

But the retired neurosurgeon did say he got a scholarship offer — more than once.

Before we start, let’s review the definition of “receive” and “got.”

On to the evidence:

In his 1996 autobiography “Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story,” Carson wrote on page 67 that after a dinner with a prominent U.S. general he was “offered a full scholarship to West Point.”

“More exciting to me, General William Westmoreland (very prominent in the Viet Nam war) attended with an impressive entourage.

Afterward, Sgt. Hunt” — his high school ROTC director — “introduced me to General Westmoreland, and I had dinner with him and the Congressional Medal winners. Later I was offered a full scholarship to West Point.”

He continued: “I didn’t refuse the scholarship outright, but I let them know that a military career wasn’t where I saw myself going

What the hell you say. He didn’t say he either “received” or “got” anything. He says “offered” and “refuse.” Pro-tip for Eliza Collins, receive and got actually have meanings. They are not existential concepts.

Is that the best she can do with that University of Oregon education?

“I had a goal of achieving the office of city executive officer [in JROTC]. Well, no one had ever done that in that amount of time … Long story short, it worked, I did it,” Carson said. “I was offered full scholarship to West Point, got to meet General Westmoreland, go to Congressional Medal dinners, but decided really my pathway would be medicine.”

Hmmm. I missed the words received and got here but I do see a word I’ve seen before: offered.

 

The University of Oregon has hot cheerleaders, but if this is an example of what they turn out in academics the place is an abysmal failure.

One has to wonder why POLITICO is persisting in peddling this story that is obviously untrue. It is so untrue you can’t even engage in semantics to make it true. The only conclusion that you can draw is that POLITICO has joined that great Democrat super PAC [mc_name name=’Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL)’ chamber=’senate’ mcid=’R000595′ ] talked about.