Georgia Voters Know Their State Is Being Used By Democrats

Credit Perdue for Senate

Anyone who’s spent any time in the great state of Georgia between the general election and the Senate runoff — happening as we speak — knows the Dresden-level shelling Georgia voters have been taking over the last month when it comes to campaign ads and GOTV efforts. They’re exhausted by it and they’ll tell you as much.

But there’s also evidence of a quiet seething, especially among Republican voters, and not at President Donald Trump, as Politico and almost every other media outlet would have the world believe. No, in fact many Republicans in Georgia — who do pay attention — know their state has been used and abused by Democrats to push a national agenda that not only won’t benefit the peach state, but is likely deleterious to the country at large.

Incumbent Republican Senator David Perdue, who’s in the fight of his life against upstart Democratic challenger John Ossoff, the latter of which has almost nothing on his resume to recommend him, is speaking for those Republicans in Georgia when he notes that his challenger has taken more money from donors in failed states than from Georgians.

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., pointed out on Tuesday that his Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff “raised twice as much money in California as he did in the state of Georgia.”

“The people in Georgia do not like people in California and New York coming down here trying to tell us how to run our state,” Perdue told “Fox & Friends” on Tuesday, the day voters in Georgia head to the polls for the Senate runoff elections. He made the statements reacting to Big Tech executives donating hundreds of thousands dollars to Ossoff, according to the nonprofit research group Center For Responsive Politics.

Perdue went on to say that he believes California and New York are “both failed states.”

“Georgia is growing,” he continued. “Our economy is rated the best in the country and best place to do business.”

“People in Georgia know that and I believe Republicans are going to show up today.”

Ossoff’s top contributors also come from donors associated with an industry facing allegations of censorship and monopolistic practices: Big Tech. Those include Google’s parent company Alphabet, which gave the Democrat candidate $952,685; Apple came in at $295,794; Microsoft, which contributed $275,864; Amazon at $255,115; and Facebook at $225,313, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.

“We’ve been talking about it throughout the race that most of my opponent’s money is coming from Big Tech in California,” Perdue said. “He raised twice as much money in California as he did in the state of Georgia. In fact, in the general election, over 80% of his money came from New York and California primarily.”

“So this is a trust fund baby that never created one American job who has really scandalous ties with the Chinese Communist Party and Al-Jazeera for that matter and has never answered any of those issues,” he continued.

Perdue’s not wrong. Ossoff, and to a lesser extent Raphael Warnock who is running to unseat Republican Kelly Loeffler, are backed by donors and special interests who have a limited relationship to the state of Georgia and her voters. What that ultimately would mean, if either Democrat wins, is that their work in the Senate will be geared toward working for the people who donated big money to get them elected, rather than the people that live in the state they ostensibly represent.

Republican voters in Georgia know that. Democrat voters might as well. If the runoff election is in any way reasonably secure, it should speak volumes about how local voters feel about being used as means to national political ends once the returns are in and counted.