Rioting and Looting in Suburban Minneapolis After Young Black Man Shot and Killed by Police

AP Photo/Noah Berger

On Sunday afternoon, police in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, a suburb of metropolitan Minneapolis, shot and killed 20-year-old Daunte Wright after conducting a traffic stop which was reportedly made because he had items hanging from his vehicle’s rear-view mirror.

The Brooklyn Center Police Department issued a statement later in the day reporting that while Duante was stopped, it was determined that he had an outstanding arrest warrant.  As officers attempted to place Duante under arrest, he was able to re-enter his vehicle and drive away.  One officer fired his service weapon at the vehicle as it departed, striking Duante.  He lost control of the vehicle some distance away, and he died at that location.

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Protesters gathered in the area of the shooting while the investigation was still underway.  At one point, Police abandoned two police vehicles that were parked in the area where the crowd had gathered, and serious damage was done to the vehicles.

But as darkness fell, BLM flags became prevalent, crowds grew larger and more agitated, and by nightfall, numerous businesses in the community were being vandalized and looted.

One member of Daunte Wright’s family called for violence.

Crowds also gathered at the Brooklyn Center Police Department headquarters.  At one point, the building went dark, but that may have simply been a tactical decision to allow a large number of officers to come out of the building under the cover of darkness.  Before long, the officers began taking aggressive measures to disperse the crowd in order to mitigate the threat.

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz did not repeat his mistake from last year when George Floyd died — when the National Guard was not called out and the Minneapolis Police Department stood down and allowed the rioters and looters to have their way.  Sunday night, Walz decided to deploy units from the Minnesota National Guard to assist the local police in restoring order.

At 9:00 am on Monday morning, former Minneapolis PD Officer Derek Chauvin’s trial resumes just a few miles away.  I’m sure the jurors will be able to set the events of Sunday night aside.