#DayWithoutAWoman Flops as #WomenWork Wins, and Here's Why

Wednesday’s International Women’s Day was loudly taken over by a stupid group of feminists who decided the best way to display women’s indispensable role in society was to not show up to fulfill said roles. However, the only thing it seemed to accomplish was getting some people fired, children missing school for the day in at least two city school districts and a whole lot of ridicule and annoyance online.

I can’t imagine what women who spent their lives dedicated to ensuring their daughters have a seat at the proverbial table would say when told modern feminists were willfully leaving those seats empty for a day.

This penchant for walking out, rather than being a presence is a curious and destructive aspect of American feminism today.

Prior to the #DayWithoutAWoman, feminist groups tried to pressure the Girl Scouts into withdrawing from the Inauguration Day parade because of Donald Trump. The Girl Scouts thankfully pushed back and cited how important it is to women that we don’t abdicate our place.

Being a leader means having a seat at the leadership table no matter what,” they said in their statement. That’s what “A Day Without Women” got fundamentally wrong. Not showing up to their jobs, paid or unpaid, was a backward step for women. Thankfully, the women who skipped work were met with a counterpoint on social media.

Women who understand that the best way to show your value and the invaluable contributions we make is to be present, posted photos and other comments with the hashtag #WomenWork.

These posts were far more powerful in displaying women’s role in society and their importance. All while not irritating everyone around them. People will always be more attracted to a positive message than they are to a whining, griping, malcontentious group of harpies refusing to do their jobs.

Those who showed how #WomenWork displayed the various essential roles women have in 2017. They easily one-upped those who protested using an empty message, with one of real empowerment by showing up and taking their hard-earned seats