Affluent Parents Organizing in Secret Against Radical Leftist Ideas in Elite High Schools

(Richard Alan Hannon/The Advocate via AP)

Bari Weiss resigned from the New York Times as an opinion writer last year, criticizing them for being too narrow in their views, among other things.

She just wrote a pretty concerning piece in the City Journal about parents who have sent their kids to top private schools but who are now upset, with some of them secretly organizing, against the radical leftist craziness that has invaded their schools.

Some of the schools are teaching capitalism is evil and that American is a bad country, but that’s not even the half of it. They’re completely fixated on race and everything is viewed through that lens. But the parents are afraid to speak up publicly about it for fear of getting tarred as racists –that they will be booted from the private schools and even from their jobs if it’s known that they’re opposing such “wokeness.”

One private school parent, born in a Communist nation, tells me: “I came to this country escaping the very same fear of retaliation that now my own child feels.” Another joked: “We need to feed our families. Oh, and pay $50,000 a year to have our children get indoctrinated.” A teacher in New York City put it most concisely: “To speak against this is to put all of your moral capital at risk.” [….]

That fear is shared, deeply, by the children. For them, it’s not just the fear of getting a bad grade or getting turned down for a college recommendation, though that fear is potent. It’s the fear of social shaming. “If you publish my name, it would ruin my life. People would attack me for even questioning this ideology. I don’t even want people knowing I’m a capitalist,” a student at the Fieldston School in New York City told me, in a comment echoed by other students I spoke with. (Fieldston declined to comment for this article.) “The kids are scared of other kids,” says one Harvard-Westlake mother.

The atmosphere is making their children anxious, paranoid, and insecure—and closed off from even their close friends. “My son knew I was talking to you and he begged me not to,” another Harvard-Westlake mother told me. “He wants to go to a great university, and he told me that one bad statement from me will ruin us. This is the United States of America. Are you freaking kidding me?”

Students said they parroted “views they don’t believe in assignments so that their grades don’t suffer.”

Can we say all of this screams like a Communist state when the people are so afraid to speak out because they know it will cost them big time?

One New York math teacher at an elite school explained it slightly differently, “I am in a cult. Well, that’s not exactly right. It’s that the cult is all around me and I am trying to save kids from becoming members.” He spoke out because he was concerned about what the kids were being taught. “I started seeing what was happening to the kids. And that’s what I couldn’t take. They are being educated in resentment and fear. It’s extremely dangerous.”

They’re being taught who is victim and oppressor based on the color of their skin. Talk about being racist. One mom explained how her son had a friend who was black at the school who believed he was “inherently oppressed.” “This kid is a multimillionaire,” she said. Not to mention well-off and going to a private school. “My son said to his friend: ‘Explain it to me. Why do you feel oppressed? What has anyone done to make you feel less?’ And the friend said: ‘The color of my skin.’”

Meanwhile “whiteness” is something to be “decentered” as one student at Fieldston explained.

But physics looks different these days. “We don’t call them Newton’s laws anymore,” an upperclassman at the school informs me. “We call them the three fundamental laws of physics. They say we need to ‘decenter whiteness,’ and we need to acknowledge that there’s more than just Newton in physics.”

So why don’t the parents just take the kids out of the schools? Because they want their kids to be successful and go to the best colleges, which has meant following that pattern of the “right schools” into the “right colleges” into the “right” high-powered jobs after. But those colleges are also doing some form of the same thing to some degree.

So, why should we care and why don’t they send the kids to public schools? They’re influencing these kids who they think will be in future power positions. And because unfortunately for all the rest of us, the public schools are also going this route, if they haven’t already gone it already.

HT: Twitchy