James Woods Finds That One Word That Should Not Be Said, and Yes, Even Dems Questioned Voting System Issues

FILE - In this Nov. 2, 2016 file photo, actor James Woods attends the premiere of the film "Bleed for This" in Beverly Hills, Calif. Woods’ agent has dropped the actor as a client, citing patriotism. On Thursday, July 5, 2018, Woods shared on Twitter an email from his agent, Ken Kaplan. In the excerpted email from Wednesday, Kaplan said he was “feeling patriotic” and no longer wanted to represented Woods. Woods is among Hollywood’s most outspoken conservatives. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Apparently any mention of Dominion voting systems or any questions related to their operation is going to get you flagged by Twitter.

Here’s what James Woods posted, not even questioning the election or making any claims at all, just posting “Dominion” with a video of some of the questions that have been raised about the system in the past.

Woods did not post anything false nor did he post anything questioning the election. But apparently just posting prior news reports will get you tagged now on the social media platform.

But it’s not just Republicans who have raised questions, the questions about Dominion and other voting systems are a bipartisan issue.

Indeed Democrats, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), raised issues about Dominion and the other two voting systems used in the country in a letter last year.

Among the things the Senators said in their letter as they were investigating issues was this:

In 2018 alone “voters in South Carolina [were] reporting machines that switched their votes after they’d inputted them, scanners [were] rejecting paper ballots in Missouri, and busted machines [were] causing long lines in Indiana.”14 In addition, researchers recently uncovered previously undisclosed vulnerabilities in “nearly three dozen backend election systems in 10 states.”15 And, just this year, after the Democratic candidate’s electronic tally showed he received an improbable 164 votes out of 55,000 cast in a Pennsylvania state judicial election in 2019, the county’s Republican Chairwoman said, ” [n]othing went right on Election Day. Everything went wrong. That’s a problem.”16 These problems threaten the integrity of our elections and demonstrate the importance of election systems that are strong, durable, and not vulnerable to attack.

As the AP has noted, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) as raised questions about a “severe underinvestment in cybersecurity” as to the machines and said that the companies had not at that point in 2018 sufficiently answered questions about what they were doing to provide for security.

That’s the language of Democrats before asking such questions became a political issue. These questions about vulnerabilities go beyond any one election and should concern everyone. Election security should be a bipartisan issue. There are certain basic things that should be a given: that there is no internet connectivity or vulnerability and that there is no foreign components or connections involved in the machines.

HT: Twitchy