Elon Musk Tests Positive, Negative, Positive, Negative All in One Day, But MSNBC Producer Doesn't Think He Should Have Told You

FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2018, file photo SpaceX founder and chief executive Elon Musk speaks in Hawthorne, Calif. Musk says he's planning to offer the public free rides through a tunnel he bored under a Los Angeles suburb to test a new type of transportation system. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

Elon Musk raised a rather important question on Twitter, saying he’d been tested four times for the Wuhan coronavirus. What mystified him was that two times it came back positive and two times it came back negative.

This of course raises a lot of questions. Why? And how is that possible? What’s going on when you get results like that? Is he false positive or falsely negative? And are such results influencing other tests elsewhere, perhaps wrongly driving up the numbers of positives?

All good questions to ask, it would seem to me, both for him and for the rest of Americans.

But MSNBC producer Kyle Griffin didn’t think so. Indeed, he claimed that it was irresponsible of Musk to even ask the question.

Why? How can stating what factually happened to you and asking why be “irresponsible?”

Moreover, why wouldn’t someone allegedly involved in “journalism” want to know the answer to the question? Isn’t this the sort of thing that would actually pique the interest of a journalist to want to know more? It would seem so, but not so much for Griffin.

Of course you could test positive and have no symptoms. Most cases are mild and only a small percentage progress on to a more serious issue, generally with people who are already compromised by other health issues. The real measure of the harmful impact is the hospitalizations and deaths.

But it would be important to see if this was a problem because of the rapid test or if there was some other issue going on here and it would help people to have a fuller understanding of what was going on with the tests. The bottom line is sometimes you get false positives and negatives. It’s important to to know that and then follow up with a more sensitive test as Musk was doing. But asking why is the very opposite of “irresponsible.” Indeed, it’s the “scientific” thing to do.

HT: Twitchy, Twitchy