Forget Donald Trump. The Celebrity Who Should Be Running For President Is Mike Rowe.

mike-rowe

If you do not follow Mike Rowe’s Facebook page, you are missing out on the type of real talk we should be getting from presidential candidates. In the most recent one, Rowe absolutely destroys the argument Bernie Sanders is putting forth about making college education free. We are watching a large number of people support a particular celebrity for president, but the real celebrity candidate we should have is Mike Rowe.

I try not to be political on this page, because the truth is, arrogance and elitism are alive and well in every corner of every party – especially with respect to this topic. But I have to admit, this is the first time I’ve seen an elected official support the hyper-inflated cost of a diploma by juxtaposing it with the hyper-inflated cost of incarceration. Honestly, I’m not sure what to make of it.

Is it possible that [mc_name name=’Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-VT)’ chamber=’senate’ mcid=’S000033′ ] doesn’t realize the number of college graduates with criminal records? Is he unaware of the millions of successful tradespeople and entrepreneurs who didn’t pay for a sheepskin, but somehow managed to stay of the clink? Does he not recognize that comments like his will encourage more kids who are better suited for an alternative path to borrow vast sums of money they’ll never be able to pay back in order to pay for a degree that won’t get them a job?

Examine, for a moment, the differences between Rowe and Sanders. Rowe has worked throughout his life at many things from opera singing to hosting a television show on blue collar work (a show he says is a tribute to his own family’s history of that work). He is a non-partisan promoter of blue collar work, has launched organizations aimed at promoting American manufacturing jobs, and has offered to work with both Democrats and Republicans to get the work ready to go.

Bernie Sanders, by comparison, hasn’t had a real job since at least 1980. He is, as Rowe states, pushing the narrative that everyone should go to a university to get an education, thereby contributing to the shrinking number of young adults in vocational and career training. He believes that it doesn’t matter how hard you work, or if you don’t at all, because everyone deserves the same share. He wishes to take away from those who work and give to those who work significantly less (or, again, those who do not work at all).

Which one of those two do you think really understands and wants to help the working class?

Photo (Next28)