NYT Publishes Op-Ed 'Yes, We Mean Literally Abolish the Police', Author Is Terrorist Supporter, Soros Fellow

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

 

On Friday night, The New York Times published an editorial entitled, “Yes, We Mean Literally Abolish the Police. Because reform won’t happen.” It was written by Mariame Kaba whom The Times says is an “organizer against criminalization.” That’s not the only thing she is. According to independent journalist Jordan Schachtel, she is both a terrorist supporter and a radical leftist. He tweeted a copy of the editorial with the caption, “Abolish the Police, brought to you by George Soros and the gang.”

The Daily Wire reports that Kaba, who, “according to a website that is in her name and a blog that she purportedly runs, is an apparent supporter of Assata Shakur – who is on the FBI’s Most Wanted Terrorist list.”

The editorial can be viewed here.

Kaba feels reforms have been tried and have failed so many times that “the only way to diminish police violence is to reduce contact between the public and the police.”

She offers her incendiary opinions as if they were facts. She writes: “So when you see a police officer pressing his knee into a black man’s neck until he dies, that’s the logical result of policing in America. When a police officer brutalizes a black person, he is doing what he sees as his job.”

As every conservative has written in the last two weeks, fired Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s actions after taking Floyd into police custody were inexcusable. He is directly responsibility for Floyd’s death. We are all in agreement on that.

However, Chauvin’s conduct wasn’t typical police officer behavior and everyone knows that. Far from it. The left is acting as if police treat suspects in this manner all the time because it supports their narrative. The reason it was so shocking is because it rarely happens.

Although Kaba would like to see the police and prisons abolished completely, she will settle for cutting the number of police and their budgets, in half for now. Kaba explains:

I’ve been advocating the abolition of the police for years. Regardless of your view on police power — whether you want to get rid of the police or simply to make them less violent — here’s an immediate demand we can all make: Cut the number of police in half and cut their budget in half. Fewer police officers equals fewer opportunities for them to brutalize and kill people. …

But don’t get me wrong. We are not abandoning our communities to violence. We don’t want to just close police departments. We want to make them unnecessary.

People like me who want to abolish prisons and police, however, have a vision of a different society, built on cooperation instead of individualism, on mutual aid instead of self-preservation. What would the country look like if it had billions of extra dollars to spend on housing, food and education for all? This change in society wouldn’t happen immediately, but the protests show that many people are ready to embrace a different vision of safety and justice.

A society without a police force to enforce the laws will quickly give way to anarchy. We need only to look at CHAZ as a microcosm, where after only a few days, disagreements have surfaced among its residents. On Friday night, a dispute erupted during a friendly game of dodgeball. Another clash arose over a street sign.

Why would The New York Times publish such rubbish on their editorial page, yet reject Sen Tom Cotton’s op-ed in which he supported using the military to end the riots? It’s almost as if they hate America.