Steve Scalise: Getting Shot Strengthened My Stances Against Gun Control

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. speaks during an interview in his offices at the U.S. Capitol Building, on Tuesday, March 24, 2015 in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) proved that he’s not only a warrior capable of taking a bullet and living to tell the tale, he’s also standing firm on his position that gun rights should remain strong and unalienable.

During an interview with Fox News’s Martha MacCallum that aired Tuesday, Scalise was asked if his being shot changed his mind about gun rights at all. Scalise answered it had, but not for the negative.

“I think it’s fortified it,” answered Scalise.

“Because first of all you’ve got to recognize that when there’s a tragedy like this, the first thing we should be thinking about is praying for the people who were injured and doing whatever we can to help them, to help law enforcement. We shouldn’t first be thinking of promoting our political agenda,” Scalise said.

Scalise took a bullet through the hip when while practicing with fellow Republican lawmakers for the Congressional Baseball Game. The wound required multiple surgeries, and while he’s out of the woods now, he still requires a scooter to get around. The majority whip is presently undergoing out-patient rehabilitation to return to full strength.

His harrowing experience, however, has given him a unique perspective on firearm related attacks. When the Las Vegas shooting occurred on Sunday, Scalise didn’t call for a changing of laws, or use his wound to drive a political point. Instead, Scalise encouraged a coming together of the community to help those affected.

“In the face of unspeakable evil, our whole nation must respond with countless acts of kindness, warmth and generosity,” said Scalise.

Scalise has always been a pro-gun rights advocate, however. He currently holds an A+ rating from the NRA for his legislative efforts to keep our 2nd Amendment rights secure. These include the National Reciprocity Act, which would allow licensed gun owners to legally concealed carry across state lines.