The Majority of America Thinks Clinton Is Dishonest, but Apparently That's Just Our Sexism Talking

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a forum on substance abuse, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, in Boston. The presidential hopeful was joined Thursday by fellow Democrats Boston Mayor Marty Walsh and Mass., Attorney General Maura Healey. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

We’re all sexists now.

Not that it was that hard to predict, but the moment Clinton jumped into the race we knew what was coming down the line as far as defending her from criticism or failures go. It’s the same thing we expected when Obama came out as the favorite to win his elections…and also used every moment he was President.

Identity politics is the left’s go to defense, and Hillary Clinton and her supporters do so love whipping out that woman card to accuse her detractors of sexism. A quick google search brings up tons of examples of supporters claiming she’s suffering at the hands of anti-woman biases. It even pops up in her children’s book.

The most recent person to use the glorious “S word,” was CNN political analyst, Peter Beinart.

“You’re not going to like this,” said Beinart to CNN Tonight’s Don Lemon. “But I don’t think you can explain Hillary Clinton’s unfavorable ratings without understanding the way that men, and some women, who are traditionally minded respond to women when they start to take traditionally male roles.”

“This is a massive cultural change that is threatened because women are not playing the traditional role that some Americans including some women would like them to continue to play,” he went on to say.

As far as political analysis goes, this is either horribly lazy, or downright dishonest. A CNN poll showed that a whopping 68% of Americans think that Hillary Clinton is dishonest. And why shouldn’t they? Hillary Clinton has been a snake almost her entire professional political career, and even far before that.

While I’ve no doubt that there are people out there that would instantly reject Clinton based on her anatomy, to say that the majority of Americans are sexist for reaching the conclusions they have about her is completely out of line. People sit back and watch Clinton blunder her way through the campaign faster than her handlers or the media can cover for her, and their main gun is to completely depart from reality like a Tumblr user, and blame her failures as our sexism.

If I was on the fence, Clinton accusing me of viewing women as something less because I’m not giving her a pass for her transgressions would seal me in with another party.

The fact is, America’s distrust of Hillary doesn’t stem from a social justice’s favorite villain. It comes from our continuously confirmed notion that Hillary is incompetent. She went for months convincing the world that her emails were of no threat, yet in one statement, her campaign admitted that Clinton’s emails were a “national security issue.”

As Sean Davis writes at The Federalist:

Sullivan did not explain how the e-mails, which Clinton said were about nothing more than her “yoga routines” and wedding planning for her daughter, could possibly pose a national security risk to the United States. Sullivan also failed to explain how unclassified e-mails “private personal e-mails” wholly unrelated to her work as Secretary of State — Clinton declared in an infamous 2015 press conference that she “did not email any classified material to anyone on my email” — could compromise American security.

She lied about landing under Sniper fire in Bosnia. She lied about the cause of Benghazi, and stood by while Americans needlessly died there. She worked to destroy the women who were sexually involved with her husband in his infidelity.

And that last point is where the sexism accusation falls completely flat. Clinton is a woman who will giddily claim she’s a feminist on camera, but when rubber meets road, Clinton is ready to throw anyone with a uterus under the bus, and run them over if it means a political plus.

There are plenty more examples of Clinton’s unwavering ineptitude and dishonesty that would lead a standard American voter to look at her with a wary eye, and he or she would be right to do so. To paint the public’s honest concerns as a character flaw we’re not guilty of says more about the Clinton campaign than it does the voter.