Burger King Bows to the Climate Change Mob With 'Reduced Methane Emissions' Cows

FILE - This Oct. 21, 2016, file photo shows a Burger King restaurant logo in Philadelphia. Burger King has delivered its own hot take on a regulatory showdown that has enflamed the U.S., with a flame-grilled Whopper. The new ad has become a sensation, with more than a million views and counting on YouTube. In the ad, customers are told they will be charged different prices for a Whopper, depending on how fast they want it. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Just when you thought you’d seen it all from the climate change mob, they manage to top their wacky behavior. But it stops being funny when their antics start to disrupt Americans’ everyday lives, as my colleague Nick Arama shared in a 2019 piece about an organized protest that took place inside a California In-N-Out Burger restaurant. In that case, neither the employees nor the police put up with the chaos the protesters were trying to cause.

But not every fast food chain stands up to the environmentalist wackos. In the latest example of companies giving in to their demands, Burger King has announced it’s found a way to get the cows used to make its burgers… well, fart less often. You just can’t make some things up.

The Associated Press:

The chain has rebalanced the diet of some of the cows by adding lemon grass in a bid to limit bovine contributions to climate change. By tweaking their diet, Burger King said July 14 that it believes it can reduce a cow’s daily methane emissions by about 33 percent….

Burger King worked with scientists at the Autonomous University at the State of Mexico and at the University of California, Davis to test and develop its formula of adding 100 grams of lemongrass leaves to the cows’ daily diets. Preliminary tests indicate that the lemongrass leaves help the cows release less methane as they digest their food.

And that’s not all. They’re now selling burgers made from those same cows:

On July 14, Burger King introduced its Reduced Methane Emissions Beef Whopper, made with beef sourced from cows that emit reduced methane, in select restaurants in Miami, New York, Austin, Portland and Los Angeles, while supplies last.

But it gets even stranger. In an effort to push the whole, pointless scheme on the public, Burger King released a bizarre music video featuring “cow-kids.” And I couldn’t agree more with Senator Cruz’s assessment of it.

Watch for yourself below:

What do you think? Leave your thoughts on Burger King’s move in the comment area below!