Advocates Speak out in Favor of Legalizing Consensual Incest

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft, File)

On April 13th, I served up the story of a parent suing in New York.

The reason: They’d like to marry their own biological child.

And in case you were wondering, the two purportedly can’t procreate.

Why, might you ask, would someone dream of putting a ring on their own offspring?

Per the plaintiff:

Through the enduring bond of marriage, two persons, whatever relationship they might otherwise have with one another, can find a greater level of expression, intimacy and spirituality.

As I noted at the time, the suit was filed April 1st. Perhaps it was an April Fool’s prank.

Either way, it seems, the subject is serious.

After all, love — like, some may say, everything else — is becoming less clearly defined.

Consider the new couplehood:

When it comes to the New York notion, the issue’s got advocates who are living life out loud.

As reported by the New York Post, “Australian Richard Morris, who is pushing to change incest laws in about 60 countries, said he supports the legal push in Manhattan Federal Court and that such behavior between consenting adults ‘should not be criminalized.’”

Richard and those of a like mind have created nearly 130 petitions — on Change.org mostly — to lift laws keeping relatives from reaping the benefits of wedded bliss.

“Most,” as the Post puts it, “have received little support.”

But eventually, will they?

It’s certainly not outside the realm of possibility.

As covered by RedState’s Brandon Morse, in October 2015, Cosmo published “This Is What It’s Like to Fall In Love With Your Brother.”

There must be some natural explanation for these feelings, Brian remembers thinking. And according to them, there is. The half-siblings say they are prime examples of genetic sexual attraction (GSA). The term was coined by Barbara Gonyo in the 1980s after she experienced an attraction to the adult son she had placed for adoption as an infant. (She later started a support group for other families.)

[I]t’s been suggested that this feeling is even stronger for consanguineous (aka related) couples, especially those who don’t develop the ick factor from growing up together. Why? “Genes tend to shape our preferences, talents, and attitudes — and familiarity creates comfort, so we look for someone similar,” Lieberman says. “For siblings, this drives an enhanced sexual attraction.” Which is exactly what happened to Melissa and Brian.

Again, that was 2015.

Culturally, we’ve come a far ways in the past six years.

Perhaps Keith Pullman’s encouraged; he runs the Full Marriage Equality blog.

As told to the Post, Pullman’s pullin’ for success in the Manhattan project:

“It is absurd to say that an adult can’t consent to marry their parent. That same adult can be sent to war, take on six or seven figures of debt, operate heavy machinery, be sentenced to death by a federal court, and consent to sex with five strangers (and marriage with one of them) but can’t consent to marry someone they love? In some of these cases, the genetic parent didn’t raise them and they met for the first time two years ago. Allegations of ‘grooming’ are laughable attempts to deny someone their rights even though it will have no impact on the person objecting.”

Back to activist Richard, he admits, “We haven’t moved any mountains yet.”

Love, relationships, sex, and social norms are changing at the speed of light.

It’s not unreasonable to suspect the law might follow.

When it comes to people one day marrying their sibling or child, mountains may not have moved…

But some hills, I’d say, have had to forward their mail.

-ALEX

 

See more pieces from me:

Christian College Sues the Biden Administration Over Joe’s Gender Identity Executive Order

Stanford University Email Tells Students Who Prompted the Atlanta Shootings, and It Isn’t the Shooter

University Lecturer Cancels Racist Children’s Songs, Including ‘Jingle Bells’

Find all my RedState work here.

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