Teen Who Went to School When He Wasn't Supposed to Gets Arrested and Charged with a Crime

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You hate to see a kid racing down the wrong path.

On September 9th, I covered the plight of Maverick Stow, the Long Island 17-year-old who went to school to kick off the semester Tuesday even though he was scheduled for remote learning that day.

The administration didn’t appreciate it, so they suspended him — every student is assigned days to be in class and others to participate from home for the sake of social distancing.

About the incident, he insisted the following:

“I was going to school like students should be going to school. I think that a five-day suspension is out of line.”

His mom — Nora Kaplan-Stow — backed him up:

“Kids need to be in school every day. Virtual learning is not learning. My son is being suspended because he wants to be in school.”

Dad Richard was on board, too:

“He’s a very smart kid. He knows what he’s doing. When he said this is how he wanted to handle things, we were like, ‘Then go for it.’”

Maverick’s a kid who lives up to his name, so on Wednesday, he was right back where he wasn’t welcome.

And on Thursday, the rebel — who may or may not wear a leather jacket, comb his hair into a pompadour, roll a pack of Pall-Malls in his sleeve, and ride a motorcycle — went to class yet again.

Sounds like he may be as rotten as this guy:

 

Hence, officials did the obvious in our brand new bizarro world of forcing people to back off: They called the police.

According to Newsday, an arrest followed.

The bad seed was charged with third-degree criminal trespassing — at a time when other revolutionaries are destroying private property and not being ticketed.

It was a bold move for William Floyd High, but how else do you deal with a guy who won’t stop trying to learn like it’s any time before 2019 and after Year Zero?

Once they’d stowed away young Stow, the school district threatened to end its in-person program because of maverick Maverick.

As relayed by The Daily Wire, thus spake William Floyd School District Public Relations Director James Montalto:

“If Mr. Stow continues to try to access school grounds each day that we are open, we will close the high school — and its approximately 3,000 students — to all in-person learning and it will be all virtual for the foreseeable future.”

It sounds like the kid’s a massive threat:

“We are still in the midst of a pandemic and will abide by the regulations set in place by our government and health officials designed to keep our students and staff safe. As we have said, Mr. Stow’s rights as a student do not surpass the rights of any of our other 8,799 students. Most of our in-person classes at the high school are at maximum capacity according to the square footage of each classroom.”

To be clear, Thursday wasn’t the first time officers were involved. School staff called the cops Wednesday, too, at which point Maverick went home.

But I guess he just couldn’t stay away from that favorite place of adolescents all over.

Despite the fact that her kid’s a delinquent, Nora’s still on his side. I guess she can’t give up on the wayward youth:

“I’m 1,000% behind him. I’m very proud of him. I support him for sticking up for something he feels passionately about.”

It’s not too late, Nora. There’s still time to turn the boy around. Maybe get him involved in some civics groups. Are there any good sloth-positive organizations in your area?

With a little work, you could fix him yet — before he ruins it for 9,000 kids, who I’m sure would hate to get to stay home.

-ALEX

 

See more pieces from me:

Woman Is Told She Can’t Vote Because of Her Shirt, So She Takes It Off

University of Michigan Hosts Two Cafes: One for Whites, One for Everybody Else

Portland Bans Facial Recognition Technology to Protect Peaceful Rioters

Find all my RedState work here.

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