Diary

Czar Wars: Kevin Jennings and Curley v. NAMBLA

I haven’t much to add to the Kevin Jennings story, but I’ve been thinking about another story that happened twelve years ago involving the rape and murder of an eight year old boy. It’s easy to tug at heartstrings and make sentimental appeals. This story was gut wrenching, but it also addressed important issues regarding NAMBLA. It was 1997 when I first realized that NAMBLA was more than a joke.

I would like to know how Kevin Jennings feels about the case of Curley v. NAMBLA (U.S.D.C. Mass. 2000). That case involved the murder of Jeffrey Curley by two members of NAMBLA. Jeffrey Curley was an eight year old boy who vanished in 1997. It was one of those missing person cases that captured hearts and headlines. Like too many missing person cases, this one ended tragically.

Jeffrey Curley’s mutilated and dismembered body was eventually found in a cement filled container on the bottom of a Maine river. Without getting into detail, Jeffrey was kidnapped and sexually assaulted. When Jeffrey fought back, his rapist suffocated him with a gasoline soaked rag and continued his sexual assault by raping the boy’s corpse.

The connections between NAMBLA and the rapists were explored. A lawsuit that was filed in 2000 was eventually dropped, but NAMBLA was exposed. In 2004, Deroy Murdock of the National Review wrote a great piece exploring the pernicious relationship between ACLU, NAMBLA and Jeffrey Curley’s rapists. Those who have questions about Kevin Jennings should read the whole thing. In part:

NAMBLA is “not just publishing material that says it’s OK to have sex with children and advocating changing the law,” says Larry Frisoli, a Cambridge attorney who is arguing the Curleys case in federal court. NAMBLA, he says, “is actively training their members how to rape children and get away with it. They distribute child pornography and trade live children among NAMBLA members with the purpose of having sex with them.”

Frisoli cites a NAMBLA publication he calls “The Rape and Escape Manual.” Its actual title is “The Survival Manual: The Man’s Guide to Staying Alive in Man-Boy Sexual Relationships.”

“Its chapters explain how to build relationships with children,” Frisoli tells me. “How to gain the confidence of children’s parents. Where to go to have sex with children so as not to get caught…There is advice, if one gets caught, on when to leave America and how to rip off credit card companies to get cash to finance your flight. It’s pretty detailed.”

“In his diary, Jaynes said he had reservations about having sex with children until he discovered NAMBLA,” Frisoli continues. “It’s in his diary in 1996, around the time he joined NAMBLA, one year before the death of Jeffrey Curley.”

The practical, step-by-step advice Jaynes followed goes far beyond appeals to sway public opinion in favor of pedophilia. Such language aids and abets felonious conduct. If such conspiracy results in homicide, it is reasonable for NAMBLA to face civil liability if not criminal prosecution.

Ohio’s Court of Appeals found NAMBLA complicit in an earlier child-rape case. NAMBLA’s literature, discovered in a defendant’s possession, reflected “preparation and purpose,” according to the Buckeye State’s top bench.

This was the basis for the Curley’s lawsuit against the origanization. Avoiding legalese, a brief wikipedia summary:

According to the Curleys’ suit, Jaynes and Sicari “stalked Jeffrey Curley… and tortured, murdered and mutilated [his] body on or about October 1, 1997. Upon information and belief immediately prior to said acts Charles Jaynes accessed NAMBLA’s website at the Boston Public Library.”

According to police, Jaynes had eight issues of a NAMBLA publication in his home at the time of his arrest. The lawsuit further alleges that “NAMBLA serves as a conduit for an underground network of pedophiles in the United States who use their NAMBLA association and contacts therein and the Internet to obtain child pornography and promote pedophile activity.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) stepped in to defend NAMBLA and won a dismissal based on the specific legal issue that NAMBLA is organized as an association, not a corporation. The Curleys continued the suit as a wrongful death action against individual NAMBLA members and NAMBLA Steering Committee members.

The target of the wrongful death suits were Roy Radow, Joe Power, David Miller, Peter Herman, Max Hunter, Arnold Schoen and David Thorstad, a co-founder of NAMBLA and well-known writer. The Curleys alleged that Charles Jaynes and Salvatore Sicari, who were convicted of the rape and murder of the Curleys’ ten-year-old son Jeffrey, were NAMBLA members… The plaintiffs dropped their lawsuit in April 2008, after a judge ruled that a key witness was not competent to testify.

For eight years, the Curley family and their lawyers labored in the courts. Powerful liberal advocacy groups stonewalled their case and the Curleys suffered a series of “technical” defeats. But the core substantive legal issues regarding NAMBLA remain. Where does our Safe Schools Czar and NAMBLA sympathizer, Kevin Jennings, stand? If we had a hearing, we would know.