Diary

MI Morning Update 11-2-2008

2 Days Until Election Day

November 2, 2008

QUOTE OF THE DAY:

“Man is not free unless government is limited.”
“The government’s (Obama’s) view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”
– Ronald Reagan

MORNING UPDATE:

SUNDAY MORNING TALK SHOWS…schedule posted below.

72 HOUR PROGRAM IN FULL SWING…Republican grassroots activist in every corner of the state are going door-to-door and making tens of thousands of phone calls to get our supporters to the polls. An energized Republican party is fighting this fight to the finish, pushing the McCain/Palin ticket and every candidate down the ballot!

PETERS’ LIES HURTING HUMANE SOCIETY…The Washington special interests supporting Gary Peters and spreading lies about Congressman Knollenberg’s record have crossed the line and now the Michigan Humane Society is paying the price.  A disgusting ad accuses Congressman Joe Knollenberg of supporting barbaric practices as dog fighting and the slaughtering of horses, and is paid for by Humane Society Legislative Fund in Washington.  In the meantime, the good meaning people of the Michigan Humane Society are paying the price.  Rightly thinking the ad is shameful, but wrongly blaming the Michigan Humane Society, donors to the organization are now keeping their money in their pocket.  So where is Gary Peters during all this?  Why isn’t he telling his friends in Washington to put a stop to this madness?  If Peters can’t stand up to the special interests hurting Michigan now, why should we trust that he would in Congress?

WALBERG…TODAY…BATTLE CREEK…join us today as we meet at the Battle Creek Victory Center on Beckley Road at 12:30pm to kick off a door-to-door effort on behalf of Congressman Tim Walberg and the rest of the Republican ticket. Join us!

CLIFF TAYLOR…and on the “non-partisan” ballot, don’t forget to go down the ballot and vote for Justice Cliff Taylor for the Supreme Court. Voting straight Republican isn’t enough…remember our judges.

VOTNG MATTERS…DON’T BE FOOLED…IT’S CLOSER THAN THE PRESS IS PITCHING…GRASSROOTS VOLUNTEERS NEEDED…as we reorganize Victory Centers and Call Centers around the state, volunteers continue to make calls, knock on doors, and make contributions to fight for Republican candidates up and down the ticket.  Please check this link for a Victory Center near you.  We need you now, more than ever.
http://www.migop.org/inner.asp?z=113

SUNDAY EFFORTS…TEAM “BRAIN DRAIN” ANNOUNCES  “GET OUT THE BRAIN DRAIN” … young volunteers are coming to your city…Please join Republican Youth from across Michigan SUNDAY NOVEMBER 2nd in two convenient locations for our final push! All Party activists young and old are welcome to help us defend our most valuable natural resources: Our college graduates.

PLEASE JOIN US TODAY AT NOON TO 8PM FOR CALLS, DOORS, and Conservative COMRADERIE.
 
In West Bloomfield: Amy Peterman’s Office
Near the corner of Maple and Orchard Lake
Address: 5640 Maple Road, #304
Candidates: Pat Dohany, Amy Peterman, Gail Haines, Shelly Taub, David Law
RSVP: Anthony Markwort: [email protected] 517-243-5961
 
In Downtown St. Joseph: Candidate Contact Center
Address: 513 State St., St. Joseph, MI 49085
Candidates: Sharon Tyler
RSVP: [email protected] 517-331-5631

TWITTER…we are on our Fight to the Finish Tour as we hit Victory Centers and campaign headquarters for our final push to election day. Follow the excitement on Twitter and our blog…we’ll be posting updates regularly. www.twitter.com/sanuzis

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FOR THE LATEST NEWS,COMMENTARY & INFORMATION:

Check…out…our…onlineArticles of Interest………News…you…can…use………

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REST OF THE STORY:

SUNDAY MORNING TALK SHOWS:

Meet the Press: Fred Thompson, John Kerry

This Week: Rick Davis, David Axelrod. Roundtable with Mark Halperin, Donna Brazile, Matthew Dowd, George Will.

Face the Nation: Axelrod, Sens. Lindsey Graham, John Ensign, Chuck Schumer

Fox News Sunday: Davis, David Plouffe, Rove

Late Edition: Sen. Bob Casey, Gov. Kaine

TODAY’S TOP STORIES

The following stories and more are available at myArticles of Interest online.


Knollenberg says attack ads on him hurting local humane society

Gordon Trowbridge / Detroit News Washington Bureau

Facing a tough fight for re-election, Rep. Joe Knollenberg on Saturday said an animal-rights group’s attacks against him are hurting the Michigan Humane Society and called on his Democratic challenger, Gary Peters, to demand that the ads stop.

Knollenberg and campaign aides told reporters they believe the ads by the Humane Society Legislative Fund, which has spent nearly $400,000 attacking Knollenberg, are harming local humane societies that are not connected to the legislative fund, a Washington, D.C., political action committee. It’s just one of the outside groups spending millions of dollars in the race, in which some independent analysts consider Peters a favorite to end Knollenberg’s time in Washington after eight terms.

Peters’ campaign said the controversy was an attempt to distract voters from the economy. Knollenberg, one of the nation’s most vulnerable House Republicans, is seeking his ninth term in a district heavily targeted by Democrats.


How Much Is Your Vote Worth?

By SARAH K. COWAN, STEPHEN DOYLE and DREW HEFFRON

“THE conception of political equality from the Declaration of Independence, to Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, to the Fifteenth, Seventeenth and Nineteenth Amendments can mean only one thing — one person, one vote,” the Supreme Court ruled almost a half-century ago. Yet the framers of the Constitution made this aspiration impossible, then and now.

Under the Constitution, electoral votes are apportioned to states according to the total number of senators and representatives from each state. So even the smallest states, regardless of their population, get at least three electoral votes.

But there is a second, less obvious distortion to the “one person, one vote” principle. Seats in the House of Representatives are apportioned according to the number of residents in a given state, not the number of eligible voters. And many residents — children, noncitizens and, in many states, prisoners and felons — do not have the right to vote.


Barack Obama ‘could worsen crisis’: Rupert Murdoch

Glenda Korporaal

In an interview with The Weekend Australian before delivering the first of six Boyer lectures on ABC radio tomorrow afternoon, Mr Murdoch said the Democrats’ policies would result in "a real setback for globalisation" if implemented.

Mr Murdoch said he did not know whether Senator Obama would implement all of the protectionist measures espoused by the party.

"Presidents don’t often behave exactly as the campaign might have suggested because they become prisoners of all sort of things – mainly circumstances and events," Mr Murdoch said.

The mood of Michigan: Economy fuels fears

BY BILL McGRAW • FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

TRAVERSE CITY — Is there a cooler city in Michigan at the moment than Traverse City, the once-dowdy resort town whose East Front Street has morphed into a micro Manhattan of chic shops, interesting restaurants and the smartly refurbished State Theatre?

Yet walk into the radio station on East Front Street, WTCM-AM, the 50,000-watt northern Michigan powerhouse, and listen as morning man Norm Jones opens the phone lines.

Jerry, an autoworker from Traverse City, called in one day recently as he commuted to his job — in Lansing, 171 miles away. He talked about rumors that management will shut down a shift.

From Stoops and Lobbies, Dialing for Obama or McCain

Between phone calls and sips of coffee, Maggie McComas enjoyed the crisp, sunny Sunday on Beatrice Sibblies’s front stoop on West 121st Street. The battleground states of Pennsylvania and New Hampshire seemed far away as she sat back in her folding chair with sheets of voters’ names and numbers.

Ms. McComas, 63, of the Upper West Side, picked up one of two cellphones from the chair in front of her. One was hers, the other borrowed from a friend, and with the minutes from both, she was ready to make “hours” of calls for Barack Obama. And soon, she said, she would be knocking on doors in Pennsylvania. “I haven’t done that since I sold Girl Scout cookies,” she said.

Inside the house, a dozen callers spread out on the stairs, on the sofa and chairs, at the dining room table and in the kitchen. It was the third weekend cellphone bank held by Ms. Sibblies, 39, a real estate developer and ardent supporter of Mr. Obama.

“A lot of people here have never done this before, and they’re a little nervous,” she said.


Equal Outcome vs. Equal Opportunity

By Ruben Navarrette

SAN DIEGO — After nearly two years, dozens of debates, hundreds of speeches, and more than a billion dollars, the final days of Campaign 2008 revolve around three words: "Spread the wealth."

That’s what a lot of Americans are arguing about as the curtain falls — including Barack Obama, John McCain, and their running mates. Both sides see it as an issue of fairness, and, oddly enough, both see it as a winner for them.

For the Obama-Biden campaign, the fair thing is that those who earn more should pay higher taxes than those who are less well-off. For McCain-Palin, government should not be playing "Robin Hood" by taxing the rich and redistributing it to the poor.


Why bipartisan government’s good for America

Michael Goodwin

Our latest national nightmare is almost over. The 2008 presidential race that started early in 2007 is the longest in modern history. It has been conducted while American troops are fighting two wars and while the home front is under threat of attack. The October surprise was a meltdown of the stock market and the start of a recession.

Was it worth it? Other than a new name in the White House and proving we can have a national election without a Bush or a Clinton on a ticket – a first since 1976 – what did America gain from this hyper-partisan, ridiculously expensive, often irrelevant bash fest?

Nothing, not yet, anyway. As Mario Cuomo famously said, you campaign in poetry and govern in prose. Wednesday starts the prose.


A Perfect Storm

By Thomas Sowell

Some elections are routine, some are important and some are historic. If Sen. John McCain wins this election, it will probably go down in history as routine. But if Sen. Barack Obama wins, it is more likely to be historic – and catastrophic.

Once the election is over, the glittering generalities of rhetoric and style will mean nothing. Everything will depend on performance in facing huge challenges, domestic and foreign. Performance is where Barack Obama has nothing to show for his political career, either in Illinois or in Washington.

Policies that he proposes under the banner of "change" are almost all policies that have been tried repeatedly in other countries – and failed repeatedly in other countries.


Democrats Shouldn’t Overinterpret a Victory Mandate

There is a very challenging question facing America that few pundits and politicians have discussed as we approach an election that could produce a landslide of potentially historic proportions.

How will a renewed and increased Democratic majority judge the results of the election? What implications will they draw from these results?

Stated simply, if the Democrats conclude that they have a mandate to implement their agenda without real consultation with the Republicans, as Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island suggested in an interview with the New York Times last weekend, the country will be headed for trouble.

Mich. clerks, workers prep for big turnout Tuesday

By DAVID EGGERT – The Associated Press

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Rosemarie Perrone has the perfect trait for an election worker: attention to detail.

The stay-at-home mom and other mothers put barcodes on books to computerize the library at her son’s Catholic elementary school.

"You’ve got to like that detail stuff in order to do this," Perrone, 51, said Saturday at a Lansing clerk’s office, where she and other election workers were busy preparing, being trained and helping a steady stream of voters cast absentee ballots.