Diary

Are These Dots Connected

Well, here’s my second attempt at this.  One important thing I have to throw out there is this:  blogging on this website has forced me out of my contractual lingo thought and into investigating the “why” of the addressed subject.  For me to get to acceptance, I have to understand it.  I don’t have to like it but I do have to understand it.

Do all of these Progressive thoughts and actions seem to be linked together?  It seems to be so, but what is the “why” of it?  Perhaps the Biblical answer to that should be left to others more adept in their knowledge, but here goes.

I thought about the Jews that were murdered and thought…why?  Wasn’t this all taken care of with the concentration camps.  Didn’t the world say “never again”?  They did.  Oh, I know that there is divergence in different sects of religion but Islam is different.

Why does the media concentrate or seem to concentrate so much on Atheism?  What has happened to our morality?  What in the heck could this have to do with the subject?

You would think that we were back in the Crusades and history seems to bear that out and connect some of the dots in the thinking.   It started this way:

The first of the Crusades began in 1095, when armies of Christians from Western Europe responded to Pope Urban II’s plea to go to war against Muslim forces in the Holy Land. After the First Crusade achieved its goal with the capture of Jerusalem in 1099, the invading Christians set up several Latin Christian states, even as Muslims in the region vowed to wage holy war (jihad) to regain control over the region. Deteriorating relations between the Crusaders and their Christian allies in the Byzantine Empire culminated in the sack of Constantinople in 1204 during the Third Crusade. Near the end of the 13th century, the rising Mamluk dynasty in Egypt provided the final reckoning for the Crusaders, toppling the coastal stronghold of Acre and driving the European invaders out of Palestine and Syria in 1291.

It ended this way:

A new Mamluk sultan, Qalawan, had defeated the Mongols by the end of 1281 and turned his attention back to the Crusaders, capturing Tripoli in 1289. In what was considered the last Crusade, a fleet of warships from Venice and Aragon arrived to defend what remained of the Crusader states in 1290. The following year, Qalawan’s son and successor, al-Ashraf Khalil, marched with a huge army against the coastal port of Acre, the effective capital of the Crusaders in the region since the end of the Third Crusade. After only seven weeks under siege, Acre fell, effectively ending the Crusades in the Holy Land after nearly two centuries. Though the Church organized minor Crusades with limited goals after 1291–mainly military campaigns aimed at pushing Muslims from conquered territory or conquering pagan regions–support for such efforts disappeared in the 16th century, with the rise of the Reformation and the corresponding decline of papal authority.

So now that we thought we were over the first and last, I think that we can conclude that we’re still fighting about this thing.  Furthermore, academia and our modern press seem to be helping Islam.  How?  By promoting the disavowment of both Judaism and Christianity.

Islam, as with the Crusades, does not consider either religion (Christianity as a collective) and Judaism as relevant.  In fact, Islam sees it as an enemy.  From Patheos.com:

What is the relationship between Islam, Christianity and Judaism?

According to the Quran, there is only one religion: submission to God (in Arabic, Islam).Those who ‘submit’ are muslims (literally, submitters).This is not only the religious belief that all humans are born knowing instinctively, it also the only religion that God’s prophets have taught throughout history around the world.All religious traditions that deviate from this primordial faith, which received its final form in Muhammad’s teachings, are deviations caused by humans’ inability to resist their own weaknesses and sinful inclinations.From the Muslim perspective, then, Judaism and Christianity are two religions that were originally based on God’s revelations to true prophets-in the case of Judaism the Torah of Moses, and in the case of Christianity the Gospel of Jesus.But the followers of Moses and Jesus corrupted their original teachings; in the case of Judaism, introducing beliefs such as seeing Jews as religiously exceptional and, in the case of Christianity, ascribing divinity to Jesus.The Quran spends a great deal of time urging Christians and Jews to abandon and correct these beliefs, drawing on Old Testament stories such as the fall of Adam and his spouse from Eden, the deliverance of the Jews from Egypt at the hands of Moses, and the saga of Joseph.The Quranic versions of these stories differ from those known in Judaism and Christianity, and the differences emphasize areas in which the Quran says that those earlier communities have erred.Jesus was born of the Virgin Mary, healed lepers and raised the dead from the grave.But in the Quran Jesus states that he is but a “word from God,” a mortal man like any other.The Jews were brought forth from Pharaoh’s persecution, faltered in Sinai, and were lead to the Promised Land.But in the Quran their standing with God depends solely on their piety and devotion to Him.In an important way, however, Christianity and Judaism are not just two religions of the world’s many faiths.The Quran identifies them both with, and calls them both back to, the prophet for whom Muhammad is the ultimate heir, the figure whom the Quran promotes as the ultimate monotheist: Abraham.The notion of an Abrahamic legacy of pure monotheism, abandoned by Christians and Jews according to the Quran but restored by Muhammad, is a central theme in Islam.

It still appears that our learned journalists, our academia, the Atheists and our president are still fighting the Crusades.  Oh this might seem an incendiary remark…but was not September 11th incendiary enough?  Wasn’t the killing of innocent people incendiary enough?  I believe in freedom of religion for all faiths.  However, those that are barbaric have no place in modern day society.