Diary

Rubio’s DREAM Act is a start but doesn’t go far enough

It seems that Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL), who will likely be the GOP VP nominee, is seeking to introduce his own version of the DREAM Act.  It isn’t the bold move we’d like to see from the GOP, but it is a decent start.

The problem with this bill is that it will not provide a path forward for citizenship.  That in-and-of itself kind of defeats the purpose of any sort of immigration reform.  But it is a very good thing that republicans are talking.

I was never an ardent opponent of Harry Reid and Obama’s Dream Act, but I didn’t support it.  I was wrong.  Part of my skepticism came from the fact that democrats didn’t pass the act until they had lost the Congress.  Hispanics were an afterthought for them.  They focused on global warming, health care reform, DODT, etc. and after everything was done and all the capital spent, they turned to Hispanics with a half-hearted effort.  But that wasn’t a good reason to oppose the DREAM Act.

Service to our country by potential citizens in return for full citizenship isn’t a bad deal for us or them.  It creates a necessary opportunity.

Rubio’s bill needs to provide a clear path to citizenship that any immigrant can easily understand.  Whether it is service in the military or elsewhere, these patriots will show they believe in and are loyal to America and should receive the same GI education benefits and healthcare as the rest of our vets already receive.

If Rubio will do that, he will endear himself to the 97% of American Hispanics that are not Cuban but rather of Mexican or South American descent.  He will show that republicans do care about fixing these issues and he will prove himself to be the only logical choice for VP, as if he needed that.  The democrats don’t have a death grip on Hispanic voting blocs yet, but they are close if we don’t act fast.  Rubio has made a good move forward on this issue.  He should introduce it before the summer and the House should pass its own version.