Diary

Democrats Save Bankers But Sweaty Union Workers Hang

It seems odd that the Democrats, the party of Unions and the Working People, are so quick to bail out banks while they are willing to let the automakers hang out to dry.  The automakers embody everything good and bad about union labor in this country.  Why force them to cut back and eliminate contracts when banks do not have to?  Then it came to me in a flash.

 

Does anybody remember this Senator Harry Reid gem from December?  “My staff tells me not to say this, but I’m going to say it anyway. In the summer because of the heat and high humidity, you could literally smell the tourists coming into the Capitol. It may be descriptive but it’s true.”

 

Our political elite like to rub elbows with the wealthy bankers.  These are people with nice clean office jobs.  They attend cocktail parties and gala events.  They are the type of people our elitist leaders would like to spend time with, and often do at fundraisers and other events.  They may try to demonize them in the media, but they are the type of people they indentify with.

 

The automakers jobs are mostly hard working labor jobs.  These men and women make their money more by the sweat of their brow than sitting in a corner office.  These are beer drinkers, not champagne gala attendees.  As they get sweaty, they will on occasion smell.  They are commoners.  Peasants.  Certainly not the high end social climbers that a member of Congress  would ever stoop to associate themselves with. 

 

This has been a theme that comes up periodically on my blog.  Congress sees themselves as an elite ruling class.  They are above the peasants that toil day in and day out at hard jobs to make ends meet.  If they must associate with commoners, at least the wealthy elite of the non-political class are closer to their level of wonderfulness.  We need new leadership that understands where their power and authority really comes from.  Their job is not to rule, but to serve the people.

 

http://federalistblogs.wordpress.com