Diary

Morning Briefing for December 22, 2010

RedState Morning Briefing
For December 22, 2010

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From all of us at RedState to each and every one of you, have a very Merry Christmas! I’ll see you in your inbox again next Tuesday and I’ll be online every day at RedState.com

God bless,
— Erick

1. Lindsey Graham Gives Away the Game

2. Obama administration caves on indefinite detention.

3. The Obama FCC has regulated the Internet

4. It’s Cens-mas!

5. The green movement of no

6. Harvard’s disingenuous Solomon Amendment statement.

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1. Lindsey Graham Gives Away the Game

There has been a lot of speculation this week about why the GOP rolled over in the Senate on virtually every issue. From Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’s repeal to START to you name it — the GOP became the party of capitulation. So much so that even Lindsey Graham is blasting the Senate GOP “for a ‘capitulation … of dramatic proportions’ to Democrats and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) in the lame-duck Congress.”In his statement about why the GOP folded like a cheap suit, Graham gives away the game. Please click here for the rest of the post.

2. Obama administration caves on indefinite detention.

They’re readying an executive order right now that will confirm that certain detainees – read: the murderous, terrorist scum that we already weren’t releasing – can be continued to be held indefinitely without trial. The fig leaf here is that the new proceedings (unlike those of the wicked, wicked Bush administration!) will be ‘more adversarial’ – which means whatever you want it to mean, of course – and that lawyers for the murderous, terrorist scum can ask again after the administration refuses to let said murderous, terrorist scum go the first time. Maybe even every year.Please click here for the rest of the post.

3. The Obama FCC has regulated the Internet

Today the FCC defied the courts, the Congress, and a clear national consensus in favor of an open Internet, when it claimed the authority to regulate the Internet and passed so-called Net Neutrality regulations.On a 3-2 vote, FCC Democrats Mignon Clyburn, Michael Copps, and Chairman Julius Genachowski voted to pass not just new Net Neutrality regulations, but an entire “framework” for future government meddling online. Republicans Robert McDowell and Meredith Baker voted against the plan.Reports are already circulating that at least one major industry firm will sue to overturn the illegal regulations, and of course Congressional Republicans will rightly rake the FCC over the coals next year. However that said, today’s result is a crippling defeat to the radicals. There weren’t three votes for a much larger power grab that the FCC could have attempted today.Please click here for the rest of the post.

4. It’s Cens-mas!

The Census Bureau today released the official reapportionment figures from the 2010 Census, which will determine (1) what states gain and lose House seats and thus will be prime targets for redistricting and (2) what states correspondingly gain and lose votes in the Electoral College for 2012.By and large, the news was good for the GOP.Please click here for the rest of the post.

5. The green movement of no

The Washington Post has a great story about the meltdown of the green movement. It is about the need of the movement to refocus because, at a critical point, voters — you — rejected their ideas and the people who carried their water in Washington and in the state capitals. What really struck me was that the Sierra Club is shifting focus from raising the cost of energy in Washington to raising it in the states and making less of it.Please click here for the rest of the post.

6. Harvard’s disingenuous Solomon Amendment statement.

ith the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell almost certain now to be passed into law*, there has been some discussion of one thing that conservatives and Republicans will absolutely require to have happen: to wit, the ending of the Ivy League’s continuing campaign against the military by forbidding ROTC programs on their campuses. Said campaign absolutely flaunts the intent of Congress (as per the ‘Solomon Amendment’), but has been generally tacitly tolerated by the government while the larger issue of gays serving openly in the military was still an open question. Which, again, it no longer is.But, – various articles to the contrary – the Ivy League’s response to news that the Senate has voted to repeal is not in fact acceptable.Please click here for the rest of the post.