Diary

Electoral Reform, Part 2: It Starts With Voter Registration

The Left will tell you that voter fraud is virtually non-existent in the United States.  To the extent it exists, they will further tell you, it is negligent to the point that if there were any instances of fraud, it made no difference to the outcome.  There may be some truth to that, but there are also close races won because of fraud- many at the local level.  The Senate race in Minnesota involving Al Franken comes to mind.  Needless to say, even a single instance of election fraud causes one to question the process in a country that fancies itself the pinnacle of representative democracy in the world.

Available statistics indicate that the bulk of electoral fraud occurs at the level of registration as a voter.  The Heritage Foundation keeps statistics on examples of election fraud and those statistics bear out this fact.  Hence, it stands to reason that the process of ensuring electoral integrity should start at this level.  As the recent 2020 election indicated, in some instances we had examples of mail-in ballots going to people who had moved or died.  When states like Ohio and Georgia reviewed and started to purge their registration rolls, the Left was in an uproar crying “disenfranchisement!”  Of dead or ineligible voters?  Of people who had moved out of state?  Of people who had absolutely no voting record?

Therefore, a decent proposal would be to have registered voters receive a state-issued voter identification card with their photo.  This would be renewed every 7-10 years with the state contacting, through the mail or email, the voter to make sure they are still present in the state, at the address listed, and even alive (if you are in Illinois), or they could use the existing in-person voting record.

Naturally, the Left will argue that issuance of such cards is a violation of one’s civil rights or that states are trying to disenfranchise people.  Further, many states now, in the interest (more like an excuse) of auto insurance, issue licenses to illegal aliens.  These people are ineligible to vote in an election and should not be registered or given the option at the time the license is issued.  The applicant must show proof of citizenship for voting purposes.

One of the iconic pictures out of Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein was one of a young woman smiling whose vote counted for the first time ever.  At the time, they fingerprinted voters with purple ink and the woman proudly displayed her hand.  Yet, in this country in some states, no proof is required at all.

One needs a valid ID to get a driver’s license, to open a credit or bank account, or board an airplane.  But to exercise one’s right to vote, no ID is required in many states.  The Supreme Court ruled that voter photo IDs are acceptable.  When Georgia enacted voter ID requirements, voter turnout actually increased.  But the dorks practicing lawfare, despite the fact that evidence proved photo ID to vote did not suppress the vote, went to court in Georgia which had, as a proportion of state population, a minority population equal to that of Mississippi which has voter ID requirements.

If these entities spent half their money helping people to secure adequate ID rather than running to courts, everyone would have a valid voter ID.  Their arguments against ID to secure the integrity of elections are ridiculous.

Recently, in an effort to increase voter turnout, many states have turned to same-day registration.  Unless a person recently turned 18 years old, there needs to be a cutoff date, preferably 30 days before any general election so that officials are given adequate time to confirm the person can legally vote.  Perhaps voter registration at age 17 provided the registrant will be 18 at the time of the next general election is an option worth pursuing.  Same day registration opens the entire process up to potential fraud.

Most importantly, verification of the registrants right to vote is the most important aspect of the entire process.  We need national consistency in this area.