Diary

So it Wasn't all Roses? McCabe Savaged Comey in Secret Meeting...

Via Townhall, an excerpt form Ed Klein’s new book details that it wasn’t actually all smiles at the top of the FBI.

If you’ll remember, the presentation at the time of Comey’s firing was that it was universally panned in the FBI, that Comey was loved by all, and that there was not a hint of division within their ranks.

That appears to be false now, and at the highest levels. Andrew McCabe (then Deputy Director of the FBI) and Rod Rosenstein (then Assistant AG) had a secret meeting before Comey’s ouster to discuss the issue.

The context of the meeting and why it happened…

Before he drew up the final version of his memo, Rosenstein asked Andrew McCabe, the deputy director of the FBI, to come to his office at the Justice Department. He told McCabe that he was thinking of recommending to the president that Comey be replaced, but that before he went ahead with such a major decision, he wanted McCabe’s candid opinion of Comey’s handling of his job.

McCabe then lowers the boom on Comey…

McCabe had long wanted Comey’s job. He believed that he had earned it, and he was willing to stab his boss in the back to get it. He told Rosenstein that Comey deserved to be fired…

…“In his meeting with Rosenstein, McCabe attacked Jim’s decision making, particularly with regard to the Hillary Clinton investigation. He told Rosenstein that Jim’s judgment was seriously flawed when he made the decision not to prosecute Hillary—a decision that should have been left to the prosecutors at Justice. McCabe also said Comey had politicized the Clinton email case beyond resurrection, and that he had been out of bounds when he went on television and gave a news conference about a suspect [Hillary] whom he was simultaneously clearing of criminal activity.

“McCabe also told Rosenstein that Jim’s personal conduct was inconsistent with acceptable behavior for a director of the FBI. He cited as an example Jim’s late-night marathon interrogation of his staff, and his lavish steak dinner while he dined alone and listened to Brahms.

This isn’t necessarily surprising or big news. Andrew McCabe is known for being ambitious and he was obviously willing to throw his “friend” under the bus to get his job.

What it does show, though, is that the FBI is not immune to internal politics, division, and power plays.

McCabe would later testify before Congress that he held Comey “in the absolute highest regard” and that he enjoyed broad support among within the FBI. While they may of been technically true on some level, Mr. McCabe appears to of not been part of that number.

Either that or he has a really odd way of showing his “support.”